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Optional Memorial of Saint Katharine Drexel

Saint Katharine Drexel

Also known as

Catherine Marie Drexel

Profile

Daughter of the extremely wealthy railroad entrepreneurs and philanthropists Francis Anthony and Emma (Bouvier) Drexel. She was taught from an early age to use her wealth for the benefit of others; her parents even opened their home to the poor several days each week. Katharine's older sister Elizabeth founded a Pennsylvania trade school for orphans; her younger sister founded a liberal arts and vocational school for poor blacks in Virginia. Katharine nursed her mother through a fatal three-year illness before setting out on her own; Emma died in 1883.

Interested in the condition of Native Americans, during an audience in 1887, Katharine asked Pope Leo XIII to send more missionaries to Wyoming for her friend, Bishop James O'Connor. The pope replied, "Why don't you become a missionary?"

She visited the Dakotas, met the Sioux chief, and began her systematic aid to Indian missions, eventually spending millions of the family fortune. Entered the novitiate of the Sisters of Mercy. Founded the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament for Indians and Colored, now known simply as the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA in 1891. Advised by Mother Frances Cabrini on getting the Order's rule approved in Rome. She received the approval in 1913.

By 1942 she had a system of black Catholic schools in 13 states, 40 mission centers, 23 rural schools, 50 Indian missions, and Xavier University in New Orleans, Louisiana, the first United States university for blacks. Segregationists harassed her work. Following a heart attack, she spent her last twenty years in prayer and meditation. Her shrine at the mother-house was declared a National Shrine in 2008.

Born

26 November 1858 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

Died

3 March 1955 of natural causes at the mother-house of the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament, 1663 Bristol Pike, Bensalem, Pennsylvania, USA 19020-8502

Canonized

1 October 2000 at Rome, Italy by Pope John Paul II

Storefront

books, statues, medals and pendants

Video

YouTube PlayList

Readings

The patient and humble endurance of the cross whatever nature it may be is the highest work we have to do. - Mother Katharine Drexel

Oh, how far I am at 84 years of age from being an image of Jesus in his sacred life on earth! - Mother Katharine Drexel

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-katharine-drexel/


Saint Teresa Eustochio Verzeri

Also known as

Ignazia Verzeri

Profile

Teresa's mother, Countess Elena Pedrocca-Grumelli, had felt drawn to the religious life, but her aunt, a Poor Clare nun, prophesied that Elena would be the mother of holy children. Teresa was the oldest of the seven children; her brother became bishop of Brescia, Italy. Ingazia was educated at home, and the canon Giuseppe Benaglio, Vicar General of the diocese of Bergamo, Italy was her spiritual teacher.

Benedictine nun at Bergamo. Dedicated to the education of young girls. Founder of the Institute of the Daughters of the Sacred Heart of Jesus on 8 February 1831. Built orphanages, retreat centers, and provided help to the old, sick and infirm; noted spiritual guide and teacher. An extensive correspondent, in addition to the Constitutions and Book of Duties for the congregation, she left over 3,500 letters. The Daughters continue their mission in Italy, Brazil, Argentina, Bolivia, the Central African Republic, Cameroon, India, and Albania.

Born

31 July 1801 at Bergamo, Lombardy, Italy as Ignazia Verzeri

Died

• 3 March 1852 at Brescia, Italy of natural causes
• her relics are in the chapel of the Daughters of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, Bergamo, Italy

Canonized

10 June 2001 by Pope John Paul II

Readings

To you and to your Institute Jesus Christ has given the precious gift of his Heart, for from no one else can you learn holiness, he being the inexhaustible source of true holiness. - Saint Teresa to the first members of the Daughters of the Sacred Heart of Jesus

The Daughters of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, like those who draw their charity from the very source of love, that is, from the Heart of Jesus Christ, must burn with the same love of the Divine Heart for their neighbor: purest charity that has no aim save for the glory of God and the good of souls; universal charity that excludes no one but embraces all; generous charity that does not draw back from suffering, is not alarmed by contradiction, but rather, in suffering and opposition, grows in vigor and conquers through patience. - Saint Teresa

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-teresa-eustochio-verzeri/


Blessed Peter de Geremia

Also known as

Pietro Geremia

Profile

Educated at the University of Bologna, Italy; brilliant law student. One night while he meditated on the worldly success he would have, he was visited by the spirit of a deceased relative, a man who had also been a lawyer, whose pride and perjury had lost him his chance at paradise. Shaken, Peter devoted himself to prayer, asking for his vocation. Soon he received a word that he should become a Dominican. In a rage, his father came to Bologna to stop him, but when he saw completely happy Peter was in religious life, the older man gave him his blessing. Peter became one of the finest preachers in Sicily, always preaching in the open air because no church was large enough to hold the crowds. Visited by Saint Vincent Ferrer. Abbey prior.

One day when there was no food for the community, Peter asked a fisherman for a donation; he was rudely refused. Getting into a boat, Peter rowed from the shore and made a sign to the fish; the creatures broke the nets and followed Peter. The fisherman apologized, Peter made another sign to the fish, and they returned to the nets. The monastery was ever afterwards supplied with fish.

Sent to establish regular observance in Sicilian monasteries. Called to Florence, Italy by the Pope to help heal the Greek schism; he managed a brief union. He was offered a bishopric, but refused.

Once when Peter was preaching at Catania, Mount Etna erupted and lava flowed toward the city. The people begged Peter to save them. He preached a brief sermon on repentance, went to the nearby shrine of Saint Agatha, removed the saint's veil, and held it towards the lava flow. The eruption ceased and the town was saved.

Peter was known as a miracle worker, raising the dead to life, healing the crippled and the blind, and converting sinners.

Born

1381 at Palermo, Sicily

Died

3 March 1452 in the convent of Santa Zita, Palermo, Sicily of natural causes

Beatified

12 May 1784 by Pope Pius VI (cultus confirmed)

Patronage

Palermo, Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-peter-de-geremia/


Blessed Benedetto Sinigardi da Arezzo

Also known as

• Benedetto Sinigardi
• Benedict of Arezzo

Additional Memorial

13 August on some calendars

Profile

Born to a wealthy and influential noble family, the son of Thomas de Sinigardo ‘Sinigardi and Countess Elizabeth Tarlati Pietramala, Benedetto received a good education, grew up in a Christian home, and was early drawn to religious life. After hearing Saint Francis of Assisi preach in the Grande Piazza in Arezzo, Italy in 1211, Benedetto became the saint‘s spiritual student, then left the wealthy and worldly life, and joined the Franciscans, receiving the habit from Saint Francis himself. Chosen Franciscan Provincial of the Marches of Ancona, Italy in 1217 at age 27. Feeling a call to work as a missionary, he became a travelling preacher in Romania, Greece, Turkey, Syria and Palestine for 20 years. Assigned by Pope Innocent IV to work in the Latin Patriarchate of Constantinople. Custos of the Holy Land and Franciscan Provincial in 1221. Built the first Franciscan monastery in Constantinople. He returned to Arezzo in 1241 where he retired to live as a prayerful monk at the convent of Poggio del Sole; he spent another 40 years there. Benedetto introduced the singing of a Marian antiphony at the convent; he would ring a bell to announce it was time to do so. The tradition spread throughout the area, and was the basis for the modern Angelus bells and prayer. He wrote on spiritual matters, including the Passion and the Blessed Virgin Mary, but none of this work has survived. Known to the local laity as a miracle worker, popular devotion to him began immediately upon his death.

Born

c.1190 in Arezzo, Italy

Died

• 1282 in the Franciscan Poggio del Sole convent in Arezzo, Italy of natural causes
• buried at the convent
• re-interred in the Basilica of San Francesco in Arezzo when the convent was demolished

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-benedetto-sinigardi-da-arezzo/


Saint Winwallus

Also known as

Bennoc, Guengalaenus, Guengaloeus, Guénolé, Guingaloëus, Guingalois, Gunnolo, Gwenndo, Gweno, Gwinocus, Gwnawg, Gwnnog, Gwynauc, Gwynawc, Gwyngawr, Gwynno, Gwynnoc, Gwynnocus, Gwynog, Ouignoualey, Valois, Vennole, Vinguavally, Waloway, Wingaloeus, Winnol, Winocus, Winwalde, Winwalloc, Winwalloe, Winwaloe, Winwaloëus, Wonnow, Wynnog, Wynolatus and Wynwallow

Additional Memorial

28 February (translation of his relics)

Profile

His father was Fragan, a Welsh noble who had recently emigrated to Brittany to escape a Saxon invasion. Ward and spiritual student of Saint Budoc on Lauren Island. Monk. Following a pilgrimage at age 20 to key Saint Patrick related sites in Ireland, Winwallus founded Landevennec monastery with eleven fellow monks at Brest, France. Abbot. The initial monastery site had to be abandoned due to poor soil and harsh weather, but Winwallus spent the rest of his days at the second site.

Legend says he lived on rye bread and ashes, water, and prayer, that he slept on sand or piles of tree bark, and that these privations led to his performing many miracles. Several churches in Cornwall, including Anglican parishes, are dedicated to him, which may indicate that his relics were moved there after the Viking invasions of 914.

Born

c.462 at Plou-Fragan, Brittany, France

Died

3 March 530 of natural causes at Tibidi, Brittany, France

Patronage

Y Vaenor, Brecknockshire, Wales

Representation

• carrying a church on his shoulders or in his hands
• ringing a bell

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-winwallus/


Saint Cunegundes

Also known as

Chunigundis, Cunnegunda, Cunigunde, Cunegonda, Kinga, Kunegunda, Kunigunde

Profile

Daughter of Sigfrid, Count of Luxembourg. Received a religious education, and took a private vow of virginity. Married Saint Henry II, Duke of Bavaria, who agreed to honour her vow. On the death of Emperor Otho III, Henry was chosen King of the Romans, and Cunegundes was crowned queen at Paderborn, Germany in 1002. Holy Roman Empress in 1014, receiving the crown from Pope Benedict VIII.

At one point, gossips accused her of adultery, but she proved her innocence by asking for God's help, then walking over pieces of flaming iron without injury.

During his time as emperor, Henry gave away the bulk of his wealth in charity; when he died in 1024, Cunegundes was left relatively poor. On the 1025 anniversary of Henry's death, which coincided with the dedication of a monastery she had built for Benedictine nuns at Kaffungen, Cunegundes took the veil, and entered that monastery, spending her remaining 15 years praying, reading, and working beside her sisters.

Died

• 1040 of natural causes
• interred in the Bamberg Cathedral, Bavaria near Saint Henry II in 1201

Canonized

1200 by Pope Innocent III

Patronage

• Bamberg, Germany, archdiocese of
• Lithuania
• Luxembourg
• Poland

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-cunegundes/


Blessed Frederick of Hallum

Profile

Son of a poor widow. Had a special devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary, to Saint John the Baptist, and to Saint Cecilia. Teacher in his home town. Priest. Vicar of his native Hallum. Premonstratensian monk. Founded the monastery of Mariengarten, Netherlands. Simultaneously abbot of Mariengarten, Groingen, and Dockum.

Born

Hallum, Frisia (in modern Netherlands)

Died

• 3 March 1175 in Frisia (modern Netherlands) of natural causes
• so many miracles were reported at his grave that it became a pilgrimage site
• relics transferred to the abbey church in Bonne-Espereance in 1616 due to Calvinist rule in Frisia; they were in the habit of destroying relics
• relics transferred to Vellereille during the French Revolution to prevent their destruction
• relics transferred to Leffe, Dinant, Belgium in 1938

Beatified

8 March 1728 by Pope Benedict XIII (cultus confirmation)

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-frederick-of-hallum/


Saint Anselm of Nonantola

Also known as

Anselm of Friuli

Profile

Duke of Friuli, Italy. Brother-in-law of the Lombard King Aistulph. Career soldier. Cleric. Founded the abbeys in Fanano, Modena, Italy, and of Nonantola, Italy. Both included hospitals and hostels. Anselm became a Benedictine monk in Rome, Italy in 753. Abbot of the house at Nonantola, which grew to a thousand brothers under his leadership. Received permission from Pope Stephen III to transfer the body of Pope Saint Sylvester I to the house. Banished to Monte Cassino by King Desiderius, but restored by Charlemagne after seven years in exile.

Born

at Forum Juhi, (modern Friuli), Italy

Died

803 of natural causes

Patronage

Nonantola, Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-anselm-of-nonantola/


Blessed Innocent of Berzo

Also known as

• Giovanni Scalvinoni
• Innocenzo de Berzo

Additional Memorial

28 September (Capuchins)

Profile

Capuchin priest. Having a special gift working with those seeking the Franciscan life, he was made assistant novice master, then director of candidates for the Order. Died on a preaching tour. His beatification miracles involved cures of terminally ill children.

Born

19 March 1844 at Niardo, Brescia, Italy as Giovanni Scalvinoni

Died

3 March 1890 at Begamo, Italy from influenza

Beatified

12 November 1961 by Pope John XXIII

Patronage

Berzo Inferiore, Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-innocent-of-berzo/


Saint Marinus of Caesarea

Also known as

Marino

Profile

Soldier in the Roman army, and a closet Christian. When a centurian's post fell open, he and another soldier applied. Marinus was the first choice, but his rival cited an ancient law that required a centurian to offer sacrifice to the emperor. Marinus confessed his Christianity, and claimed he could not offer the sacrifice. He was given three hours to change his mind, and spent the time in church with the bishop Theotecnus, meditating on a sword and scroll of the gospels. And the end of his three hours he again refused to make the sacrifice, and was executed for his faith.

Died

• beheaded c.262 at Caesarea, Palestine
• buried by the Senator Saint Asterius of Caesarea

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-marinus-of-caesarea/


Blessed Antonio Francesco Marzorati

Also known as

Samuele Marzorati

Additional Memorial

4 March (Franciscans)

Profile

Franciscan, joining on 5 March 1792 at Lugano, Switzerland, and taking the name Samuele. priest Missionary to Ethiopia. In 1716 the emperor declared a persecution of Christians. Father Samuele was arrested and ordered to renounce his faith; he refused. Martyr.

Born

10 September 1670 in Biumo Inferiore, Varese, Italy

Died

stoned to death by a mob on 3 March 1716 in Gondar, Ethiopia

Beatified

20 November 1988 by Pope John Paul II

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-antonio-francesco-marzorati/


Saint Arthelais of Benevento

Also known as

Artelais, Artellais, Arthellais

Profile

Daughter of Roman imperial proconsul Lucius and Aithuesa. The emperor Justinian desired her, but she had taken vows of holy chastity and so fled to Benevento, Italy where she stayed with her uncle Narses Patricius. En route she was kidnapped by highway men, but was miraculously freed after three days.

Born

544 at Constantinople

Died

• 560 in Benevento, Italy of fever
• relics moved to the Benevento cathedral

Patronage

• against bodily ills, illness or sickness
• exiled people
• kidnap victims
• sick people
• Benevento, Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-arthelais-of-benevento/


Blessed Johannes Laurentius Weiss

Also known as

Liberat Weiss

Additional Memorial

4 March (Franciscans)

Profile

Franciscan, taking the name Liberat. Priest Missionary to Ethiopia. In 1716 the emperor declared a persecution of Christians. Father Liberat was arrested and ordered to renounce his faith; he refused. Martyr.

Born

4 January 1675 in Konnersreuth, Bavaria, Germany

Died

stoned to death by a mob on 3 March 1716 in Gondar, Ethiopia

Beatified

20 November 1988 by Pope John Paul II

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-johannes-laurentius-weiss/


Blessed Jacobinus de Canepaci

Also known as

• Jacobino de Canepacis
• Jacopino of Canepaci

Profile

Born poor. Carmelite lay-brother at Vercelli, Italy. Alms-beggar for his house. Noted for his great piety and devotion to the Blessed Virgin.

Born

1438 at Vercelli, Piedmont, Italy

Died

3 March 1508 of natural causes

Beatified

5 March 1845 by Pope Gregory XVI (cultus confirmed)

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-jacobinus-de-canepaci/


Blessed Pierre-René Rogue

Also known as

Pietro Renato Rogue

Profile

Priest. Member of the Congregation of the Mission (Vincentians). Ordered to take an oath of allegiance to the anti-Catholic government of the French Revolution; he refused. Martyr.

Born

11 June 1758 in Vannes, Morbihan, France

Died

3 March 1796 in Vannes, Morbihan, France

Beatified

10 May 1934 by Pope Pius XI

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-pierre-rene-rogue/


Blessed Michele Pío Fasoli

Also known as

Michael Pío da Zerbo

Additional Memorial

4 March (Franciscans)

Profile

Franciscan priest Missionary to Ethiopia. In 1716 the emperor declared a persecution of Christians. Father Michele was arrested and ordered to renounce his faith; he refused. Martyr.

Born

3 May 1676 in Zerbo, Pavia, Italy

Died

stoned to death by a mob on 3 March 1716 in Gondar, Ethiopia

Beatified

20 November 1988 by Pope John Paul II

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-michele-pio-fasoli/


Saint Non

Also known as

Nonna, Nonnita

Profile

Nobility, possibly of a royal house. Widow. Legend says she was the unwed mother of Saint David of Wales. Lived in convents in Wales, Cornwall, and Brittany.

Died

• in Brittany, France of natural causes
• relics initially enshrined in Cornwall, England
• relics destroyed during the Reformation

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-non/


Saint Calupan

Also known as

Caluppano

Profile

Monk at Meallot, Auvergne, France. He spent his later years as a hermit in a cave near the monastery.

Born

c.526

Died

3 March 576 at Auvergne, France of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-calupan/


Saint Gervinus

Profile

Educated at episcopal school at Rheims, France. Benedictine. Canon of Rheims. Abbot. Friend of Saint Edward the Confessor. Great preacher, and very devoted to the Divine Office. Collected ancient Greek and Latin manuscripts. Leper.

Born

at Rheims, France

Died

1075 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-gervinus/


Saint Emeterius of Calahorra

Also known as

Emiterius, Hemeterius, Hemiterius, Madir

Profile

Soldier in Imperial Roman army in Spain. Martyr.

Born

Spanish

Died

4th century Calahorra, Old Castile, Spain

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-emeterius-of-calahorra/


Saint Asterius of Caesarea

Also known as

Asterus, Asturius

Profile

Roman senator. Martyred for giving a Christian burial to Saint Marinus of Caesarea.

Died

beheaded c.262 at Caesarea, Palestine

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-asterius-of-caesarea/


Saint Sacer

Also known as

Mo-Sacra

Profile

Descendant of Roderic, king of Ireland. Founded the monastery of Saggard, Dublin, Ireland, and served as its first abbot.

Born

Irish

Died

7th century of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-sacer/


Saint Cheledonius of Calahorra

Profile

Soldier in Imperial Roman army in Spain. Martyr.

Born

Spanish

Died

4th century Calahorra, Old Castile, Spain

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-cheledonius-of-calahorra/


Saint Foila

Also known as

Faile, Fallena, Follenna

Profile

Sister of Saint Colgan. Co-patroness with him of the parishes of Kil-Faile and KilGolgan, County Galway, Ireland.

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-foila/


Saint Camilla

Profile

Converted by and spiritual student of Saint Germain of Auxerre. Hermit.

Born

at Civitavecchia, Italy

Died

c.437 at Ecoulives, France of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-camilla/


Saint Lamalisse

Profile

Hermit in Scotland. The small island of Lamlash near Arran, Scotland is named for him.

Born

Scottish

Died

7th century of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-lamalisse/


Saint Titian of Brescia

Profile

Evangelizing bishop of Brescia, Italy.

Born

in Germany

Died

c.536 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-titian-of-brescia/


Saint Cele-Christ

Also known as

Christicola

Profile

Hermit. Reluctant bishop of Leinster, Ireland.

Died

c.728 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-cele-christ/


40 Martyrs in North Africa

Profile

A group of Christians martyred together in North Africa, date unknown. No details have survived, but we know these names - Antonius, Artilaus, Asclipius, Astexius, Basil, Bosimus, Carissimus, Castus, Celedonius, Claudianus, Cyricus, Donata, Emeritus, Emeterius, Euticus, Felix, Fortunatus, Frunumius, Gajola, Georgius, Gorgonius, Hemeterus, Isicus, Janula, Julius, Luciola, Luciolus, Marcia, Marinus, Meterus, Nicephorus, Papias, Photius, Risinnius, Sabianus, Savinianus and Solus

http://catholicsaints.info/40-martyrs-in-north-africa/


Martyrs of Pontus

Profile

A large group of Christians martyred together in the persecutions of Emperor Maximian Galerius and governor Ascleopiodato. We have some details on three of them - Basiliscus, Cleonicus and Eutropius.

Died

308 in Pontus (in modern Turkey)

http://catholicsaints.info/martyrs-of-pontus-3-march/


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