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Saint Chad of Mercia

Also known as

• Chad of Lichfield
• Apostle of Mercia
• Ceadda...

Additional Memorial

4 May (translation of relics)

Profile

Brother of Saint Cedd and Saint Cynibild. Missionary monk to Ireland with Saint Egbert. Ordained in 653. Studied Latin and astronomy. Abbot at Lastingham monastery, Yorkshire, England; abbot to Saint Owen.

Not long after Chad became abbot, Saint Wilfrid of York was chosen Bishop of Lindisfarne, a see which was soon moved to York. Wilfrid went to Gaul for consecration, and stayed so long that King Oswiu declared the see vacant and procured the election of Chad as bishop of York. Chad felt unworthy, but threw himself into the new vocation, travelling his diocese on foot, evangelizing where he could. When Wilfrid returned in 666, Saint Theodore, Archbishop of Canterbury, decided that Chad's episcopal consecration was invalid, and that Chad must give up the diocese to Wilfrid. Chad replied that he had never thought himself worthy of the position, that he took it through obedience, and he would surrender it through obedience. Theodore, astonished at this humility, consecrated Chad himself, and appointed him bishop of the Mercians in Lichfield in 669.

He founded monasteries, including those at Lindsey and Barrow-upon-Humber, evangelized, travelled and preached, reformed monastic life in his diocese, and built a cathedral on land that had been the site of the martyrdom of 1,000 Christians by the pagan Mercians. Miraculous cures reported at the wells he caused to be dug for the relief of travellers.

Legend says that on one occasion two of the king's sons were hunting, were led by their quarry to the oratory of Saint Chad where they found him praying. They were so impressed by the sight of the frail old man upon his knees, his face glowing with rapture, that they knelt, asked his blessing, and converted. The pagan King Wulfhere was so angry that he slew his sons, and hunted down Saint Chad for some of the same. But as he approached the bishop's cell, a great light shone through its single window, and the king was almost blinded by its brightness; he abandoned his plan for revenge.

During storms, Chad would go to chapel and pray continually. He explained, "God thunders forth from heaven to rouse people to fear the Lord, to call them to remember the future judgment…when God will come in the clouds in great power and majesty to judge the living and the dead. And so we ought to respond to God's heavenly warning with due fear and love so that as often as God disturbs the sky, yet spares us still, we should implore God's mercy, examining the innermost recesses of our hearts and purging out the dregs of our sins, and behave with such caution that we may never deserve to be struck down."

NOTE: I get the occassional email from visitors asking if Chad is the patron of elections, disputes, disputed elections, losers, or some other element related to 2000's disputed American presidential election. I have absolutely no evidence that there are patrons of elections, and certainly none that Chad has anything to do with it. It was not until 31 October 2000 that politicians and elected officials received a patron, and that's Saint Thomas More. Times were rough in 7th century England, but I have no record of Chad hanging, dangling, dimpled or pregnant. As you see above, he was involved in a disputed election, but no patronage tradition resulted. Also note that when a dispute arose, Chad stepped aside for the greater good. Wish our current politicians had such grace; but no one ever accused them of being saints.

Born

c.620 in Northumbria, England

Died

• 2 March 672 at Lichfield, England of natural causes after a brief illness, probably the plague
• his initial tomb was in the form of a small wooden house
• some relics preserved in the cathedral of Saint Chad in Birmingham, England

Patronage

• Birmingham, England, archdiocese of
• Lichfield, England, diocese of

Representation

• bishop holding Lichfield Cathedral and a branch, usually a vine
• bishop holding the cathedral in the midst of a battlefield with the dead surrounding him
• man with a hart leading hunters to him by a pool
• converting Saint Wulfhald and Saint Rufinus who converted on finding him in chapel while they were hunting

Readings

King Oswy sent to Kent a holy man of modest character, well versed in the Scriptures, and practicing with diligence what he had learned from them, to be ordained bishop of the church of York…. But when they reached Kent, they found that Archbishop Deusdedit had departed this life and that as yet no other had been appointed in his place.

Thereupon they turned aside to the province of the West Saxons, where Wine was bishop, and by him the above mentioned Chad was consecrated bishop, two bishops of the British nation, who kept Easter in contravention of the canonical custom from the 14th to the 20th of the moon, being associated with him, for at that time there was no other bishop in all Britain canonically ordained besides Wine. Saint Theodore of Canterbury had not yet arrived.

As soon as Chad had been consecrated bishop, he began most strenuously to devote himself to ecclesiastical truth and purity of doctrine and to give attention to the practice of humility, self- denial and study: to travel about, not on horseback, but on foot, after the manner of the apostles, preaching the Gospel in the towns and the open country, in cottages, villages and castles, for he was one of Aidan's disciples and tried to instruct his hearers by acting and behaving after the example of his master and of his brother Cedd. - Venerable Bede

Almighty God, whose servant Chad, for the peace of the Church, relinquished cheerfully the honors that had been thrust upon him, only to be rewarded with equal responsibility: Keep us, we pray, from thinking of ourselves more highly than we ought to think, and ready at all times to step aside for others, (in honor preferring one another,) that the cause of Christ may be advanced; in the name of him who washed his disciples' feet, your Son Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. - prayer on the feast of Saint Chad

The beloved Guest who would visit our brethren has deigned to come to me also this day and to summon me from the world. Turn your steps to the church and bid the brethren to commend in their prayers my going hence to God, and to remember to prepare for their own departure, the hour of which is yet uncertain, by watching and by praying and by good works. - having been warned of approaching death, Saint Chad speaks to his brothers

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-chad/


Saint Angela of the Cross Guerrero

Also known as

• Angela de la Cruz
• Angela Guerrero Gonzalez
• Angela of the Cross Guerrero y Gonzélez
• Angelita (family nickname)
• Maria of the Angels
• Mother Angela of the Cross
• Mother of the Poor

Profile

One of fourteen children born to a poor but pious family; only five of her siblings survived to adulthood. Her father worked as a cook and her mother a laundress in a Trinitarian Fathers convent, and Angela had to quit school at age twelve to work in a shoe factory to help support her family. She made her First Communion at age eight, Confirmation at nine; she prayed the rosary daily, and had a great devotion as a youth to Christ Crucified. Her piety was so obvious that her employer, Antonia Maldonado, brought her to the attention of Father José Torres Padilla. He became her spiritual director when she was 16, and helped discern if Angela had a call to religious life.

She first tried to join the Carmelites, was refused, and when she was finally accepted at age 19, became so sick that she was forced to return to her family. When she recovered, she began caring for cholera victims, and those even poorer than herself. In 1868 she entered the convent of the Daughters of Charity of Seville, Spain, but again her health failed, and she was forced to return to her parents and the shoeshop. In 1871, with Father Padilla's blessing, she started a plan whereby she lived at home under a particular Rule, yearly renewing her vows.

While in prayer in 1873 Angela received a vision that she understood was calling her to a mission to the poor, and she began keeping a spiritual diary to record what she understood of the life to which God was calling her. Others were attracted to her life, and on 2 August 1875 the Congregation of the Cross was born. The Congregation works with the sick, the poor, orphans, the homeless, finding them food, medicine, housing, and other needs, living solely on alms, and keeping only enough for themselves to continue their work. Though they started with only Mother Angela and three sisters, they had grown to 23 convents during her life, and continue their good works today.

Born

30 January 1846 at Seville, Spain as Maria of the Angels Guerrero Gonzalez

Died

2 March 1932 in Seville, Spain of natural causes

Canonized

4 May 2003 by Pope John Paul II at Plaza de Colón, Madrid, Spain

Readings

The nothing keeps silent, the nothing does not want to be, the nothing suffers all. The nothing does not impose itself, the nothing does not command with authority, and finally, the nothing in the creature is practical humility. - Saint Angela

Love and sensitivity to the poor…prompted Saint Angela of the Cross to found her "Company of the Cross" for the most deprived with a charitable and social dimension that made an enormous impact on the Church and society of Seville in her day. Her distinctive traits were naturalness and simplicity, seeking holiness with a spirit of mortification and at the service of God in her brothers and sisters. - Pope John Paul II in his homily at the canonization of Saint Angela

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-angela-of-the-cross-guerrero/


Saint Agnes of Prague

Also known as

• Anezka Ceské
• Anezka Premyslovna
• Agnes of Bohemia

Profile

Born a princess, the youngest daughter of King Ottokar I and Queen Constance of Bohemia. Relative of Saint Elizabeth of Hungary.

Educated by Cistercian nuns at Trebnitz, Germany. Though she early perceived a call to religious life, Agnes was for years promised into a series of arranged marriages for political reasons. At age three she was promised to a prince named Boleslaus. When he died prior to the marriage, she was betrothed to Prince Henry, son of the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II. When Henry chose to marry another, young Agnes was betrothed to Emperor Frederick himself. With the help and intervention of Pope Gregory IX, though affronted, Frederick released Agnes from her marriage obligations, acknowledging that he had lost her to the king of heaven.

She built a Franciscan hospital on land donated by her brother, King Wenceslaus I. She then established the Confraternity of the Crusaders of the Red Star to staff it and its related clinics. She later built a Franciscan friary, and in 1234, Poor Clare convent of Saint Saviour in Prague (in modern Czech Republic) with the aid of five nuns sent by Saint Clare of Assisi herself. Agnes entered the convent of Saint Saviour herself on Pentecost Sunday 1234, eventually became its abbess, and spent 50 years in the cloister.

Agnes was always free with her wealth in service of the poor. She enjoyed cooking for the other sisters, and mending the clothes of lepers. She had the gifts of healing and prophecy, and was given to ecstasies. Though they never met, she and Saint Clare of Assisi kept up an extensive correspondence for two decades, and some of the letters have survived to today.

Born

1205 at Prague, Bohemia (modern Czech Republic)

Died

6 March 1282 at Saint Saviour convent, Prague, Bohemia of natural causes

Canonized

12 November 1989 by Pope John Paul II at Rome, Italy

Video

YouTube PlayList

Readings

Agnes of Bohemia, although she lived in a period far removed from ours, still remains a shining example of the Christian faith and heroic charity, which invites us to reflection and imitation. She is an example of courage and spiritual help for the young people who generously consecrate themselves to the religious life; for all those who follow Christ; she is a stimulus of charity practiced toward everyone with total dedication, overcoming every barrier of race, nation or mentality; she is the heavenly protectress of our difficult daily journey. To her we can therefore turn with great trust and hope. - Pope John Paul II, during the canonization recognition of Saint Agnes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-agnes-of-prague/


Saint John Maron

Also known as

John the Sarumite

Profile

Son of Agathon, the governor of Sarum, and Anohamia, grandson of prince Alidipas, and a member of the Frankish royal family which governed Antioch. Educated in Antioch and the monastery of Saint Maron, studying mathematics, sciences, philosophy, theology, linguistics and scripture. Monk at the monastery of Saint Maron, adding the name Maron to his own. Priest.

John studied Greek and patrology in Constantinople. Returning to Saint Maron's, he wrote on such diverse topics as teaching, rhetoric, the sacraments, management of Church property, legislative techniques, and liturgy. He composed the Eucharistic Prayer which still bears his name. Noted teacher and preacher, he explained Catholic dogma to the Council of Chalcedon, wrote a series of letters to the faithful against Monophysitism and Monothelitism, and then travelled to Syria to explain and refute the heresy.

Bishop in 676, assigned to Mount Lebanon with a mission to oppose heresies, keep the Maronites united with Rome, and support the faithful in an area being invaded by Arabs. He travelled extensively in the areas involved in combat, preaching, conducting Mass, tending to the sick, and sheltering the homeless. It was during this terrible period that he was given the gift of healing, curing many praying over them.

The Maronites made up the bulk of the Maradite army, the so-called "Brass Wall" that shielded Constantinople and the Byzantine empire from Arab expansion. In 685 the Maradites used their power and importance to choose John Maron, one of their own, as Patriarch of Antioch and all the East. John received the approval of Pope Saint Sergius I, and became the first Maronite Patriarch of the oldest see in Christianity.

The Byzantine emperor Justinian II feared the growing power of the Maradite army, and was angered that his approval had not been sought for the appointment of John as Patriarch. He sent his army to defeat the Maradites and capture John. They managed to win battles against the Maradites, overrun Antioch, and destroy the monastery there, killing 500 monks in the process. John, however, escaped to Lebanon. When Justinian's army followed, the Maradites, under the leadership of John's nephew Ibrahim, defeated them decisively, sending them home empty-handed. John then founded the monastery of Reesh Moran (head of our Lord) in Kefer-Hay, Lebanon, and moved his see to Mount Lebanon. The Maradites sealed themselves off from the outside, and founded their own national and religious identity, though still part of the Catholic Church, with John seen as one of their great founders.

Born

7th century in Sarum

Died

• 707 at Kefer-Hay, Lebanon of natural causes
• buried in the Reesh Moran monastery

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-john-maron/


Blessed Engelmar Unzeitig

Also known as

• Angel of Dachau
• Hubert Unzeitig

Profile

Professed priest in the Congregation of Missionaries of Mariannhill, ordained in 1939 and taking the name Engelmar. Parish priest in Glöckelberg, Czech Republic. Arrested by the Gestapo on 21 April 1941 for the crime of being a priest and preaching against the teachings of the Nazis, he was sent to the Dachau concentration camp where he ministered to other prisoners. He learned Russian so he could minister to prisoners from Eastern Europe. He volunteered to tend to prisoners suffering from typhoid and died of the disease himself.

Born

1 March 1911 in Czech Republic as Hubert Unzeitig

Died

2 March 1945 in Dachau, Oberbayern, Germany of typhoid fever

Beatified

• 24 September 2016 by Pope Francis
• beatification celebrated in the Cathedral of Sankt Kilian, Würzburg, Germany, presided by Cardinal Angelo Amato

Video

YouTube PlayList

Readings

Whatever we do, whatever we want, is surely simply the grace that carries us and guides us. God’s almighty grace helps us overcome obstacles.

Love doubles our strength, makes us inventive, makes us feel content and inwardly free. If people would only realise what God has in store for those who love him!

Even behind the hardest sacrifices and worst suffering stands God with his Fatherly love, who is satisfied with the good will of his children and gives them and others happiness.’

– from letters written from the Dachau concentration camp by Father Engelmar to his sister

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-engelmar-unzeitig/


Blessed Charles the Good

Also known as

Charles of Flanders

Profile

Born a prince, the son of King Saint Canute of Denmark and Adela of Flanders. After his father's murder, he was raised in the court of his maternal grandfather, Robert de Frison, Count of Flanders (part of modern Belgium. Fought in the Second Crusade. Succeeded Robert II as count of Flanders in 1119. Married into the family of the Duke of Clermont (in modern France. His rule was a continuous defense of the poor against profiteers of his time, both clerical and lay. Called the Good by popular acclamation. Reformed laws to make them more fair, supported the poor, fed the hungry, walked barefoot to Mass each day. Martyred in the church of Saint Donatian of Rheims at Bruges by Borchard, part of a conspiracy of the rich whom he had offended.

Born

1083

Died

• beheaded on 2 March 1127 at Bruges, Belgium
• relics at the Cathedral of Bruges

Beatified

1883 by Pope Leo XIII (cultus confirmed)

Patronage

• counts
• Crusaders
• Burges, Belgium, diocese of

Representation

• nobleman with a purse and a sword
• after his martyrdom in the cathedral

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-charles-the-good/


Saint Luke Casali

Also known as

• Luke Casalius
• Luca Casali
• Luca of Nicosia

Profile

Educated by the abbot of the monastery of Saint Philip at Agira, Sicily, Italy. Monk at Agira. Priest. Reluctant abbot of his house.

Lucas eventually, for unknown reasons, went blind. One day while they were travelling to Nicosia, one his monks tried to play a trick on the blind abbot by telling him that some towns-people were following them in hope of hearing him preach. Lucas stopped, turned to where he was told the people were standing, and began to preach to the empty field. When he finished, the stones along the road all shouted "Amen", confounding the practical joker. A church dedicated to Lucas was later built on the spot.

Born

Nicosia, Sicily, Italy

Died

• c.800 at the monastery of Saint Philip in Agira, Sicily, Italy of natural causes
• most relics still in Agira
• some relics in Nicosia, Sicily, Italy

Patronage

Nicosia, Sicily, Italy (his intervention ended a plague there in 1575

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-luke-casali/


Saint Joavan of Brittany

Also known as

Jaoua, Joevin, Joévin, Jouva, Jaouen, Yaouen

Profile

Moved from Britain to Brittany to become the spiritual student of his uncle Saint Paul Aurelian. Monk at Landevennec, Brittany (in modern France). Co-adjutor bishop with, and successor to Saint Paul. At least two churches in Brittany are dedicated to him.

Born

6th century Romano-Briton

Died

• c.570 of natural causes
• buried at Plougen
• his tomb survives, but not his relics

Patronage

• against cancer
• Plouvien, France

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-joavan-of-brittany/


Saint Quintus the Thaumaturge

Also known as

• Quintus the Confessor
• Quintus of Phrygia
• Quinto

Profile

Raised a Christian. Immigrated to Aeolis in Asia Minor, and developed a ministry of serving the poor. Arrested and tortured for refusing to made sacrifice to pagan idols during the persecutions of Marcus Aurelius; his ability to work miracles had drawn the attention of the anti-Christian authorities. When he was released, his wounds were instantly healed and he immediately returned to caring for the local poor.

Born

Phrygia (in modern Turkey)

Died

c.283 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-quintus-the-thaumaturge/


Blessed Girolamo Carmelo di Savoia

Also known as

San Carmel

Profile

Born to the nobility, a member of the family of the Dukes of Savoy. Soldier. Joined the Mercedarians in Barcelona, Spain on 25 March 1542. Received visions of the Blessed Virgin Mary to whom he was extremely devoted. Wrote in defense of the dogma of the Immaculate Conception. Some accounts describe him as bishop of Teruel, Spain, but that diocese had not been established during his lifetime.

Died

28 May 1558 at Barcelona, Spain of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-girolamo-carmelo-di-savoia/


Saint Cynibild of Laestingaeu

Also known as

• Cynibild of Lastingham
• Cynebill, Cynibil

Profile

Born to the nobility, the brother of Saint Chad and Saint Cedd. Educated at Lindisfarne by Saint Aidan and Saint Finan, and then in Ireland. Priest. Evangelized the Anglo-Saxons in Northumbria. Founded a monastery in Laestingaeu in north Yorkshire (modern Lastingham), England in 658, and became a monk there.

Born

c.622 in Northumbria, England

Died

664 in Lastingham, England of plague

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-cynibild/


Saint Fergna the White

Also known as

• Fergna of Iona
• Ferona, Virgno

Profile

Relative and spiritual student of Saint Columba. Abbot at the monastery of Iona.

Born

6th century in an area in modern northern England or southern Scotland

Died

c.630 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-fergna-the-white/


Saint Felix of Treves

Profile

Bishop of Treves, France in the late 4th-century. Zealous opponent of the Priscillianist heresy. Late in life he retired to live as a monk. Most early records of his diocese were destroyed in the 9th century, and no other information about him has survived.

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-felix-of-treves/


Saint Willeic

Also known as

Velleicus, Willaik, Willeicus

Profile

Benedictine monk. Spiritual student of Saint Swithbert. Prior and then abbot of the abbey of Kaiserwerth, Germany.

Born

in England

Died

726 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-willeic/


Saint Basileus the Martyr

Profile

Martyred in the persecution of Valerian.

Died

• c.258 at Rome, Italy
• buried beside the Latin Way

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-basileus-the-martyr/


Saint Troas

Also known as

Troade

Profile

Martyred in the persecutions of Decius. Saint Gregory the Wonderworker wrote about him.

Died

Neo-Caesarea, Pontus (in modern Turkey)

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-troas/


Saint Jovinus the Martyr

Profile

Martyred in the persecution of Valerian.

Died

• c.258 at Rome, Italy
• buried beside the Latin Way

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-jovinus-the-martyr/


Saint Lorgius of Caesarea

Also known as

Lorgio

Profile

Martyr.

Died

Caesarea, Cappadocia, date unknown

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-lorgius-of-caesarea/


Saint Absolon of Caesarea

Also known as

Absala of Caesarea

Profile

Martyred at Caesarea, Cappadocia, date unknown.

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-absolon-of-caesarea/


Saint Slebhene

Also known as

Slebhine

Profile

Monk. Abbot of Iona, Scotland from 752 to 767.

Born

Ireland

Died

767

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-slebhene/


Saint Gistilian

Also known as

Gistlian

Profile

Fifth-sixth century monk at Menevia, Wales. Uncle of Saint David of Wales.

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-gistilian/


Saint Lucius of Caesarea

Profile

Martyr.

Died

Caesarea, Cappadocia, date unknown

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-lucius-of-caesarea/


Martyrs of Campania

Also known as

Martyrs under the Lombards

Profile

Approximately 400 northern Italian Christians martyred for their faith by pagan Lombards. Their story was recorded by Pope Saint Gregory the Great, who reports that they people spent their final days supporting each other with prayer.

Died

c.579 in Campania, Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/martyrs-of-campania/


Martyrs of Porto Romano

Profile

Group of Christians martyred in the persecution of Diocletian. The only other information that survives are the names of four of them - Heraclius, Januaria, Paul and Secondilla.

Died

c.305 at Porto Romano at the mouth of the River Tiber, Rome, Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/martyrs-of-porto-romano/


Also celebrated but no entry yet

• Arsenius of Tver
• Grimo of Ursberg


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