9 September • yesterday
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Memorial of , Priest

Saint Peter Claver

Also known as

• Pedro Claver Corberó
• Slave of the Blacks
• Slave of the Slaves

Additional Memorial

8 September (New Cartagena, Colombia)

Profile

Farmer's son. Studied at the University of Barcelona. Jesuit from age 20. Priest. Influenced by Saint Alphonsus Rodriguez to become a missionary in America. Ministered, physically and spiritually, to slaves when they arrived in Cartegena, converting a reported 300,000, and working for humane treatment on the plantations for 40 years. Organized charitable societies among the Spanish in America similar to those organized in Europe by Saint Vincent de Paul.

Born

1581 at Verdu, Catalonia, Spain

Died

8 September 1654 at Cartegena, Colombia of natural causes

Beatified

21 September 1851 by Pope Blessed Pius IX

Canonized

15 January 1888 by Pope Leo XIII

Patronage

• African missions (proclaimed in 1896 by Pope Leo XIII)
• African-Americans
• slaves, against slavery
• black missions
• black people
• foreign missions
• inter-racial justice
• race relations
• Missionary Sisters of Saint Peter Claver
• Colombia
• Accra, Ghana, archdiocese of
• Lake Charles, Louisiana, diocese of
• Shreveport, Louisiana, diocese of
• Witbank, South Africa, diocese of

Video

YouTube PlayList

Readings

We must speak to [slaves] with our hands by giving, before we try to speak to them with our lips. - Saint Peter Claver

To love God as He ought to be loved, we must be detached from all temporal love. We must love nothing but Him, or if we love anything else, we must love it only for His sake. - Saint Peter Claver

To do the will of God, man must despise his own; the more he dies to himself, the more he will live to God. - Saint Peter Claver

Yesterday, 30 May 1627, on the feast of the Most Holy Trinity, numerous blacks, brought from the rivers of Africa, disembarked from a large ship. Carrying two baskets of oranges, lemons, sweet biscuits, and I know not what else, we hurried toward them. We had to force our way through the crowd until we reached the sick. Large numbers of the sick were lying on the wet ground or rather in puddles of mud. To prevent excessive dampness, someone had through of building up a mound with a mixture of times and broken pieces of bricks. This, then, was their couch, a very uncomfortable one not only for that reason, but especially because they were naked, without any clothing to protect them. We laid aside our cloaks, therefore, and brought from a warehouse whatever was handy to build a platform. In that way we covered a space to which we at last transferred the sick, by forcing a passage through bands of slaves. Then we divided the sick into two groups: one group my companion approached with an interpreter, which I addressed the other group. There were two blacks, nearer death than life, already cold, whose pulse could scarcely be detected. With the help of a tile we pulled some live coals together and placed them in the middle near the dying men. Into this fire we tossed aromatics. Then, using our own cloaks, for they had nothing of the sort, and to ask the owners for others would have been a waste of words, we provided for them a smoke treatment, by which they seemed to recover their warmth, and the breath of life. The joy in their eyes as they looked at us was something to see. This was how we spoke to them, not with words but with our hands and our actions. And in fact, convinced as they were that they had been brought here to be eaten, any other language would have proved utterly useless. Then we sat, or rather knelt, beside them and bathed their faces and bodies with wine. We made every effort to encourage them with friendly gestures and displayed in their presence the emotions which somehow naturally tend to hearten the sick. After this we began an elementary instruction about baptism, that is, the wonderful effects of the sacrament on body and soul. When by their answers to our questions they showed they had sufficiently understood this, we went on to a more extensive instruction, namely, about the one God, who rewards and punishes each one according to his merit, and the rest. Finally, when they appeared sufficiently prepared, we told them the mysteries of the Trinity, the Incarnation and the Passion. Showing them Christ fastened to the cross, as he is depicted on the baptismal font on which streams of blood flow down from his wounds, we led them in reciting an act of contrition in their own language. - from a letter by Saint Peter Claver

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-peter-claver/


Blessed Jacques Désiré Laval

Also known as

• Apostle of Mauritius
• Jacob Désiré Laval

Profile

Son of a prosperous farmer, Jacques grew up in a pious household with examples set by his mother and an uncle who was a priest. Jacques' mother died when the boy was seven years old. Intially torn between the priesthood and medicine, Jacques was educated at local schools, Evraux, and Stanlislaus College in Paris, France, and received his medical degree in 1830. Jacques established his medical practice in Saint André and Saint Ivry-la-Bataille in his native Normandy, France and became more worldly, ignoring spiritual things.

However, a near-fatal fall from a horse led him to re-examine his life. A few months later he closed his practice and entered the seminary of Saint Sulpice. Ordained four years later in 1838. Parish priest in Normandy for two years. But Jacques felt a call to more active ministry, and he finally gave all his possessions to the Society of the Holy Heart of Mary (which later became the Congregation of the Holy Spirit and Immaculate Heart of Mary), and was sent as a missionary to Mauritius on 14 September 1841; he never saw France again.

Slavery had only recently been outlawed in Mauritius, and many of Jacques' potential parishioners were freed slaves, poor, uneducated, often unemployed, and always treated as second class citizens. Jacques lived with them, learned their language, fasted when supplies were short, slept in a packing crate, used his medical training to heal them, and explained that to God there were no unimportant people, that no one was second class. He instituted reforms in agriculture, sanitation, medicine, science, and teacher education. He placed responsibilities on people, checked their performance, and as so often happens, the people rose to the occasion. The faith spread throughout the region, and Jacques is believed to have made 67,000 converts in his parish.

He knew, respected, worked with, and received help from leaders of local Muslims, Buddhists and Hindus on the island. There were 40,000 mourners of all faiths at his funeral. The date of his death has become a national holiday in Mauritius with an average of 100,000 Christians, Animists, Buddhists, Shintoists, Hindus and Muslims making pilgrimage to his tomb that day.

Born

18 September 1803 in Croth, Normandy, France

Died

• 9 September 1864 in Port Louis, Mauritius of natural causes
• buried at the Church of Saint Croix, Port Louis, Mauritius
• his tomb receives about 8,000 pilgims a week, and is known as a site of miracles

Beatified

• 29 April 1979 by Pope John Paul II
• first beati of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit and Immaculate Heart of Mary

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-jacques-desire-laval/


Blessed Maria Euthymia Üffing

Also known as

• Emma Uffing
• Maria Eutimia

Profile

One of eleven children of August Üffing and Maria Schmidt, Emma grew up in a pious family in a small town. At 18 months, she developed a form of rickets that stunted her growth and left her in poor health the rest of her life. Made her First Communion on 27 April 1924, and was Confirmed on 3 September 1924. Emma worked on her parents' farm as a child, and by her early teens began to feel a call to religious life. She worked as an apprentice in house keeping management at the hospital in Hopsten, Germany, completing her studies in May 1933. Entered the Sister of the Congregation of Compassion (Klemensschwestern) on 23 July 1933, taking the name Euthymia; she made her simple vows on 11 October 1936, and her final profession on 15 September 1940. Assigned to work at Saint Vincent's Hosptial in Dinslaken, Germany in October 1936. Graduated with distinction from the nursing program on 3 September 1939. Worked as nurse through World War II, and in 1943 she was assigned to nurse prisoners of war and foreign workers with infectious diseases. She worked tirelessly for her charges, caring for them, praying for them, and insuring they received the sacraments. After the war she was given supervision of the huge laundry rooms of the Dinslaken hospital, her order's mother-house, and the Saint Raphael Clinic in MÜnster, Germany; what little spare time she had was spent in prayer before the Eucharist.

Born

8 April 1914 in Halverde, Germany as Emma Uffing

Died

morning of 9 September 1955 at MÜnster, Germany of cancer

Beatified

7 October 2001 by Pope John Paul II

Readings

Her life shows us that seemingly small things can be very important in God's eyes. From the human viewpoint this sister was not a "star" in the limelight, but her silent work was a ray of light to many people that is still shining today. - Pope John Paul II during the beatification recognition for Blessed Maria

Sister Euthymia's life was a canticle of hope in the midst of the war. - Father Emile Esche, one of Blessed Euthymia's patients

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-maria-euthymia-uffing/


Blessed Pierre Bonhomme

Profile

Pierre was known as a pious and studious child who early felt a call to the priesthood. He entered seminary at Montfaucon, France in November 1818 at age 15. While a deacon he opened a school for boys. Ordained on 23 December 1827 at age 24, and served in the diocese of Cahors, France.

He opened a seminary preparatory school in 1831. Founded the Children of Mary to help provide for the spiritual and mundane needs of girls in Gramat, France. He urged the young people in his groups and schools to visit and help the poor elderly who were effectively abandoned. He established a home for the indigent, and to staff it he founded the Congregation of Sisters of Our Lady of Calvary dedicating to teaching children, helping the poor, sick, elderly, and disabled.

As part of his parish work, Pierre preached missions in the region, and became known as a excellent preacher, converting many. He had a special devotion to Our Lady of Rocamadour. Once while preaching a retreat, he completely lost his voice; through prayer to Our Lady of Rocamadour he was miraculously healed and finished the retreat. Father Pierre felt a desire to become a Carmelite, but his bishop insisted that he continue his work as a missioner, and gave him a new group of missioners to work with. Pierre obeyed, preaching until 1848 when larynx disease forced him to stop.

His mission vocation over, Pierre turned his attention to the Congregation, expanding their work into care for the deaf and mute in 1854, and the mentally ill in 1856. His last years were spent in spiritual guidance of the Sisters, writing their Rule, and expanding the areas of their good works. Today the Congregation has sisters working in France, Brazil, Argentina, Guinea, Ivory Coast and the Philippines.

Born

4 July 1803 in Gramat, Lot, France

Died

9 September 1861 at Gramat, Lot, France

Beatified

23 March 2003 by Pope John Paul II

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-pierre-bonhomme/


Saint Kieran the Younger

Also known as

• Kieran of Clonmacnoise
• Ceran, Ciaran, Kyaranus, Kyran, Kyrian, Queran, Queranus, Ciarano, Querano, Kiriano
• one of the Twelve Apostles of Ireland

Profile

Son of Beoit, a carpenter and chariot builder. Spiritual student of Saint Finian of Clonard and Saint Dermot. Considered the most learned monk at Clonard. Tutor to the daughter of the king of Cuala. Lived seven years as a hermit at Inishmore with Saint Enda. Monk at the abbey of Isel in central Ireland, but was run off by his brother monks - his charity to the local poor was so great that it threatened to bankrupt the abbey. He lived for a while with eight other hermits on Inish Aingin. Founder of the Clonmacnoise abbey in West Meath, and served as its first abbot. Spiritual teacher of Saint Comgall of Bangor. He placed that house under a singularly austere rule, referred to as the Law of Kieran to draw those monks who felt a need to ignore the physical world completely. The house was known for centuries as a center of Irish learning and thought. Reported miracle worker.

Born

c.516 at Connacht, County Roscommon, Ireland

Died

c.556 of natural causes

Patronage

diocese of Clonmacnois, Ireland

Storefront

medals and pendants

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-kieran-the-younger/


Saint Joseph of Volokolamsk

Also known as

• Ivan Sanin
• Joseph of Volotsk
• Joseph Sanin
• Svyatoy Iosef Volokolamsky

Profile

Monk. Abbot at the monastery of Borovsk, Russia in 1477, but his strict discipline did not sit well with his brothers. Founded the monastery at Volokolamsk, Russia in 1479, and served as its abbot. Reformer in his houses, stressing discipline, fasting, obedience, devotion to the liturgy, learning, and works of charity; his vision of a monastery included support of social services to local laity. Met Saint Nilus of Sora at a Council at Moscow, Russia in 1503 to discuss the church reforms each had put forth; Joseph's ideas won out, and helped changed the direction of the Church activities in his land.

Born

1440 in Lithuania

Died

9 September 1515 at Volokolamsk, Russia of natural causes

Canonized

1578 by Pope Gregory XIII

Readings

Know this, brethren: do not creep out of the church before the dismissal prayer, for he who exits from the divine chant or converses or whispers has been seduced by demons, as the Divine Scriptures bear witness. - Saint Joseph

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-joseph-of-volokolamsk/


Blessed Maria de la Cabeza

Also known as

• Maria of the Head
• Maria Toribia

Additional Memorial

15 May with Saint Isidore the Farmer

Profile

In Torrelaguna, Spain she met and married to Saint Isidore the Farmer. She spent her life working on the farm, cleaning local chapels and shrines, helping the poor. The title of the Head is due to her head being a relic venerated for centuries, and the need to distiguish her from so many other Saints Mary.

Born

at Uceda, Guadalajara, Spain

Died

• c.1175
• relics long displayed in a Franciscan convent in Torrelaguna, Spain
• relics moved to Saint Andrew's Church in Madrid, Spain in 1645 and interred beside Saint Isidore

Beatified

• by Pope Leo X (cultus confirmed)
• 11 August 1697 by Pope Innocent XII (cultus confirmed)

Patronage

• Sabana Grande, Puerto Rico
• World Youth Day 2011

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-maria-de-la-cabeza/


Saint Bettelin

Also known as

Bertram, Bertellin, Bethlin, Bethelm

Profile

Spritual student of Saint Guthlac of Croyland. One of several hermits around Croyland in Lincolnshire, England who were subject to the monastery there.

Some stories claim Bettelin was a Mercian nobleman married to an Irish princess. While the two were travelling through a forest, the princess went into labour. Bettelin went for help, and while he was gone the princess delivered the baby; the two were eaten by wolves. This traumatic event reputedly sent Bettelin to the hermitage. The reliability of the story is, well, questionable.

Died

• 8th century of natural causes
• the remains of his shrine are found in Staffordshire, England

Patronage

Stafford, England

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-bettelin/


Saint Omer

Also known as

Audomarus

Profile

In 617, following the death of his parents, Omer became a Benedictine monk at Luxeuil, France under the direction of Saint Eustace. Bishop of Therouanne in 637. He reformed the administration of his diocese, and supported ministry to the sick and poor; his brother monks from Luxeuil played a large role in this work. Founded the monastery of Sithiu; it became a great religious center, and the town that developed around it became known as Saint Omer. Reputed miracle worker.

Born

595 near Constance, France

Died

• 670 of natural causes
• interred in the church that has since been named the cathedral of Saint Omer

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-omer/


Saint Gorgonius of Nicomedia

Additional Memorial

28 December as one of the 20,000 Martyrs of Nicomedia

Profile

Favourite and trusted servant in the court of Emperor Diocletian. Convert to Christianity. Tortured and martyred with a group of other Christians during the persecutions of Diocletian.

Died

• strangled to death in 303 in Nicomedia, Bithynia (modern Izmit, Turkey)
• relics moved to Rome, Italy by order of Pope Saint Gregory IV

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-gorgonius-of-nicomedia/


Blessed George Douglas

Additional Memorial

22 November as one of the Martyrs of England, Scotland, and Wales

Profile

Studied in Paris, France. Priest. Ministered to covert Catholics in England. Arrested in York and martyred for the crime of being a priest. One of the Martyrs of England, Scotland, and Wales.

Born

Edinburgh, Scotland

Died

hanged, drawn, and quartered on 9 September 1587 in York, North Yorkshire, England

Beatified

22 November 1987 by Pope John Paul II

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-george-douglas/


Saint Dorotheus of Nicomedia

Additional Memorial

28 December as one of the 20,000 Martyrs of Nicomedia

Profile

Favourite and trusted servant in the court of Emperor Diocletian. Convert to Christianity. Tortured and martyred with a group of other Christians during the persecutions of Diocletian.

Died

strangled to death in 303 in Nicomedia, Bithynia (modern Izmit, Turkey)

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-dorotheus-of-nicomedia/


Saint Valentinian of Chur

Profile

Bishop of Chur, Switzerland. Known for his charity to the poor, his ministry to prisoners, and his support of people of Rhaetia who were displaced by invading Franks.

Died

• 12 January 548 of natural causes
• interred in the tomb of the church of San Stefano
• relics moved to the church of San Lucio in the 8th century

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-valentinian-of-chur/


Saint Osmanna

Also known as

Argariarga, Osanna

Profile

Born to an illustrious family. Benedictine nun. Anchoress near Brieuc, Brittany (in modern France).

Born

Ireland

Died

• c.650 at Saint Brieuc, Brittany, France of natural causes
• some relics were destroyed by Calvinists in 1567
• remaining relics are at church of Saint Denys near Paris, France

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-osmanna/


Saint Wilfrida

Also known as

Wilfreda, Wuifritha, Wulfritha

Profile

Mother of Saint Edith of Wilton, the result of adultery with King Edgar the Peaceable. Benedictine nun at Wilton, England, hoping that a life in the convent would make up for her sins. Spiritual student of Saint Ethelwald. Abbess of Wilton.

Died

988 at the convent at Wilton, England of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-wilfrida/


Saint Wulfhilda

Profile

May have been a member of the Anglo-Saxon nobility. While a novice at Wilton abbey, King Edgar the Peaceful sought her hand in marriage. She declined, and eventually took her vows as a Benedictine nun. Abbess of convents in Barking and Ilorton in 993.

Born

England

Died

c.1000 in England of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-wulfhilda/


Saint Severian

Profile

Roman imperial senator during the persecutions of Licinius. He witnessed the martyrdom of the Forty Martyrs of Sebaste and was moved to proclaim his own faith. Martyr.

Born

Armenian

Died

flesh torn off his body with iron rakes in 320

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-severian/


Blessed Gaufridus

Profile

Benedictine monk. Spiritual student of Blessed Vitalis. Abbot at Savigny from 1122 to 1139 during which the congregation increased to 29 houses in Normandy, France, in England and in Ireland.

Died

1139 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-gaufridus/


Saint Gorgonio of Rome

Also known as

Gorgonius

Profile

Martyr.

Died

Two Laurels cemetery, Via Labicana, Rome, Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-gorgonio-of-rome/


Saint Alexander of Sabine

Profile

Martyr.

Died

martyred in 690 in the Sabine region of Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-alexander-of-sabine/


Saint Hyacinth

Profile

Martyr.

Died

690 in the Sabine region of Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-hyacinth-9-september/


Saint Basura of Masil

Profile

Bishop of Masil. Martyred in the persecutions of Diocletian.

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-basura-of-masil/


Saint Tiburtius

Profile

Martyr.

Died

690 in the Sabine region of Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-tiburtius/


Martyred in the Spanish Civil War

Thousands of people were murdered in the anti-Catholic persecutions of the Spanish Civil War from 1934 to 1939. I have pages on each of them, but in most cases I have only found very minimal information. They are available on the CatholicSaints.Info site through these links:

Blessed Teódulo González Fernández


Also celebrated but no entry yet

• Clemenzia of the Holy Trinity
• Francis Garate
• Mary of Colonna
• Mary of the Resurrection


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