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Saint Giovanni Battista Rossi

Also known as

• John Baptist de Rossi
• John Baptist Rossi
• John Baptist de Rubeis

Profile

One of four children born to Charles de Rossi and Frances Anfossi. Taken by a wealthy noble couple to Genoa, Italy for schooling. There he met some Capuchin friars who thought well of him, and helped him continue his education in Rome, Italy. Studied under the Jesuits at the Roman College at age 13. Member of the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin and the Ristretto of the Twelve Apostles. Epileptic. His self-imposed acts of austerity nearly broke his health, and he never completely regained his strength. Studied philosophy and theology under the Dominicans. Ordained on 3 March 1721, assigned to Rome.

Helped start a hospice for homeless women near Saint Galla's hospice in Rome. Canon of Santa Maria, Cosmedin in 1737; he used his compensation from the position to purchase an organ for the church. Missioner and catechist to the teamsters, farmers, herdsmen, homeless, sick, beggars, prostitutes, and prisoners of the Campagna region. For many years, John was avoided hearing confessions for fear he would have a seizure in the confessional, but the bishop of Civitá Castellana convinced him it was part of his vocation. John relented, and soon became a sought after confessor in Rome; he once said that the shortest road to heaven was to guide others there by the confessional. Sought after preacher. Assigned as catechist to many government and prison officials, including the public hangman. Miracle worker. Always had a special devotion to Saint Aloysius Gonzaga.

Born

22 February 1698 at Voltaggio, diocese of Genoa, Italy

Died

• 23 May 1764 at Trinita dei Pellegrini, Italy of multiple strokes
• relics initially at Saints Trinita church
• relics translated to Saint John Baptist Rossi parish church in Rome, Italy in 1965

Canonized

8 December 1881 by Pope Leo XIII

Video

YouTube PlayList

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-john-baptist-rossi/


Saint William of Rochester

Also known as

William of Perth

Profile

William led a wild and misspent youth, but as an adult he had a complete conversion, devoting himself to God, caring especially for poor and neglected children. He worked as a baker, and gave every tenth loaf to the poor. He attended Mass daily, and one morning on his way to church he found an infant abandoned on the threshold. He named the baby David, and adopted him, and taught him his trade.

Years later he and David set out on a pilgrimage to the Holy Lands. During a stop-over in Rochester, England the boy David turned on William, clubbed him, cut his throat, robbed the body, and fled. Because he was on a holy journey, and because of the miraculous cures later reported at his tomb, he is considered a martyr.

A local insane woman found William's body, and plaited a garland of honeysuckle flowers for it; she placed the garland on William, and then on herself whereupon her madness was cured. Local monks, seeing this as a sign from God, interred William in the local cathedral and began work on his shrine. His tomb and a chapel at his murder scene, called Palmersdene, soon became sites of pilgimage and donation, even by the crown. Remains of the chapel can be seen near the present Saint William's Hospital.

Born

12th century at Perth, Scotland

Died

• throat cut in 1201 at Rochester, England
• interred in the cathedral at Rochester

Canonized

1256 by Pope Innocent IV

Patronage

adopted children

Storefront

medals and pendants

Video

YouTube PlayList

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-william-of-rochester/


Saint Jane Antide Thouret

Also known as

• Joan Antide Thouret
• Jeanne Antide Thouret

Profile

Daughter of a tanner. Her mother died when Jane was 16 years old, leaving the girl to manage the family and help her father raise her younger siblings. Joined the Sisters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul in 1787 at Paris, France, and worked in various hospitals over the next five years. During the suppression of religious orders in the French Revolution, she was ordered to return home to a secular life. Jane refused, and tried to escape the authorities; she was beaten so badly that it took months to recover.

She finally returned on foot to Sancey-de-Long where she cared for the sick, and opened a small school for girls. In the late 1790's the government repression forced her to flee to Switzerland. There she teamed up with other exiled religious and clergy to minister to the sick. However, due to anti-Catholic prejudice in the area, the group was forced to move on to Germany.

Jane later returned to Landeron, Switzerland where she met with her order's Vicar-General of Besançon. He asked her to found a school and hospital for her Order, and in 1799 the school opened in Besançon, France. The congregation Jane founded to run these institutions was the Institute of the Daughters of Saint Vincent de Paul. The group soon began to expand, to operate other schools and hospitals in France, Switzerland, and Italy, and moved into prison ministry. The Institute received papal approval in 1819.

Born

27 November 1765 at Sancy-le-Long, diocese of Besançon, France

Died

24 August 1826 at Naples, Italy of natural causes

Canonized

14 January 1934 by Pope Pius XI

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-jane-antide-thouret/


Saint Euphrosyne of Polotsk

Also known as

• Yefrasinnya Polatskaya
• Efrasinnia, Efrosin, Euphrasinne, Evfrosinia, Pradslava

Profile

Daughter of Prince Svyatoslav of Polotsk. Granddaughter of Prince Polacak Usiaslau. Entered the Convent of Holy Wisdom at Polotsk, a house founded by her aunt, at age 12; she was later joined by her sister, two nieces, and a cousin. Hermit in a cell in the Cathedral of Holy Wisdom. Book copyist; proceeds from the sale of the books were given to the poor. Founded a convent at Seltse. Pilgrim to Constantinople; received by emperor Manuel I and Patriarch Michael III. Pilgrim to the Holy Lands where she was received by the Crusader King Amaury I. Especially venerated by Belarussians, Ruthenians, Lithuanians, and Russians.

Born

1110 at Polotsk, Belarus as Pradslava

Died

• 1173 at the monastery of Mar Saba near Jerusalem of natural causes
• re-interred in the Monastery of the Caves at Kiev in 1187
• relics translated to Polotsk in 1910 at the Saviour-Efrosinia Convent

Canonized

1984 by Pope John Paul II in Belarus

Patronage

Belarus

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-euphrosyne-of-polotsk/


Blessed Ivo of Chartres

Also known as

Yves, Yvo

Profile

Born to the French nobility. Studied in Paris and the abbey of Bec in Normandy. Fellow student with Saint Anselm of Canterbury. Prior at Saint Quentin, Beauvais c.1069. Teacher. Bishop of Chartres in 1090. Consulted on matters of theology and canon law, and a strong opponent of simony. Imprisoned for opposing King Philip I's attempt to abandon his wife to make another marriage in 1092. Many of his letters and sermons survive to today. One of the most notable bishops of France at the time of the lay investiture controversy.

Born

c.1040 at Beauvais, France

Died

23 December 1115 of natural causes

Beatified

• 1570 by Pope Pius V (office granted)
• by Pope Benedict XIV (added to martyrology)

Representation

alms-giving

Works

• Tripartita
• Decretum
• Panormia

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-ivo-of-chartres/


Saint Michael of Synnada

Also known as

Michael the Confessor

Profile

Moved to Constantinople as a young man where he became a student of Saint Tarasius of Constantinople. Friend of Saint Theophylact of Nicomedia. Monk in a monastery on the Bosporus. Recalled to Constantinople by student of Saint Tarasius who ordained him. Bishop of Synnada, Phrygia (in modern Turkey) in 787. Part of the Second Council of Nicaea in 787. Imperial diplomat to caliph Harun al-Rashid in 806, to Pope Saint Leo III in 811, and Blessed Charlemagne in 812. Exiled in 814 and imprisoned in 815 by emperor Leo V for defending the use of icons.

Died

826 in Eudokiadu, Turkey of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-michael-of-synnada/


Saint Guibertus of Gorze

Also known as

• Guibertus of Gembloux
• Guibert of...

Profile

Born to the French nobility. Soldier who fought in several campaigns. Hermit on his estates at Gembloux, Brabant (in modern Belgium. Founded a monastery in Gembloux. Benedictine monk at Gorze Abbey near Metz, France. Though he wanted to retire from the world, he was forced to return to Gembloux several times to defend the rights of the foundation he established to support the monastery.

Born

in the Lorraine region of France

Died

962 at Gorze Abbey in France of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-guibertus-of-gorze/


Saint Desiderius of Langres

Also known as

• Desiderius of Genoa
• Desiderio, Dizier, Didier, Désiré

Additional Memorial

11 February (Hieronymian Martyrology)

Profile

Bishop of Langres, France. Supported the Acts of the Council of Serdica in 343. Killed by Vandal invaders while trying to negotiate with them for the people in his diocese. Martyr with many of his flock.

Born

407 in Genoa, Italy

Died

• beheaded near Langres, France
• buried in Langres

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-desiderius-of-langres/


Blessed Wincenty Matuszewski

Additional Memorial

12 June as one of the 108 Martyrs of World War II

Profile

Priest in the diocese of Wloclawek, Poland. Murdered by occupying Nazi forces for the crime of being a Catholic priest. Martyr.

Born

3 March 1869 in Chruscienska Wola, Lódzkie, Poland

Died

23 May 1940 in Witowo, Kujawsko-Pomorskie, Poland

Beatified

13 June 1999 by Pope John Paul II

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-wincenty-matuszewski/


Blessed Józef Kurzawa

Additional Memorial

12 June as one of the 108 Martyrs of World War II

Profile

Priest in the diocese of Wloclawek, Poland. Murdered by occupying Nazi forces for the crime of being a Catholic priest. Martyr.

Born

6 January 1910 in Swierczyni, Wielkopolskie, Poland

Died

23 May 1940 in Witowo, Kujawsko-Pomorskie, Poland

Beatified

13 June 1999 by Pope John Paul II

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-jozef-kurzawa/


Saint Eutychius of Valcastoria

Also known as

• Eutychius of Norvia
• Eutizio of...

Profile

Sixth-century hermit and monk whose piety led many to God. Miracle worker. Abbot of a monastery in Valcastoria, Italy. Pope Gregory the Great wrote about him.

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-eutychius-of-valcastoria/


Saint Florentius of Valcastoria

Also known as

Florentius of Norcia

Profile

Sixth-century hermit and monk whose piety led many to God. Miracle worker. Abbot of a monastery in Valcastoria, Italy. Pope Gregory the Great wrote about him.

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-florentius-of-valcastoria/


Blessed Leontius of Rostov

Profile

Missionary to Russia. Monk at the Caves of Kiev. Bishop of Rostov in 1051 where he served for over 25 years.

Born

Greek

Died

1077 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-leontius-of-rostov/


Saint Epitacius of Tuy

Also known as

Epictetus, Epictritus

Profile

First bishop of Tuy, Galatia (in modern Spain).

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-epitacius-of-tuy/


Saint Syagrius of Nice

Also known as

Siacre, Siagrio

Profile

Monk at Lerins, France. Founded Saint Pons Monastery at Cimiez, France. Bishop of Nice, France in 777.

Died

c.787

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-syagrius-of-nice/


Saint Onorato of Subiaco

Also known as

Honoratus, Honore

Profile

Benedictine monk in the early 6th century. Abbot at Subiaco, Italy, leading a community formed by Saint Benedict.

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-onorato-of-subiaco/


Saint Spes of Campi

Profile

Monk. Abbot in Campi, Italy. Totally blind for 40 years, his eyesight was suddenly restored for the last 15 days of his life.

Died

c.515

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-spes-of-campi/


Saint Euphebius of Naples

Also known as

Efébo

Profile

4th century bishop of Naples, Italy.

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-euphebius-of-naples/


Saint Goban Gobhnena

Profile

Sixth-seventh century abbot at Old-Leighlin, County Limerick, Ireland.

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-goban-gobhnena/


Saint Basileus of Braga

Profile

First bishop of Braga, Portugal.

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-basileus-of-braga/


Martyrs of Béziers

Profile

20 Mercedarian friars murdered by Huguenots for being Catholic. Martyrs.

Died

1562 at the Mercedarian convent at Béziers, France

http://catholicsaints.info/martyrs-of-beziers/


Martyrs of Cappadocia

Profile

A group of Christians tortured and martyred in the persecutions of Diocletian and Galerius. Their names and the details of their lives have not come down to us.

Died

having their bones crushed, c.303 in Cappadocia (in modern Turkey)

http://catholicsaints.info/martyrs-of-cappadocia/


Martyrs of Carthage

Profile

When a civil revolt erupted in Carthage in 259 during a period of persecution by Valerian, the procurator Solon blamed it on the Christians, and began a persecution of them. We know the names and a few details about 8 of these martyrs - Donatian, Flavian, Julian, Lucius, Montanus, Primolus, Rhenus and Victorius.

Born

African

Died

beheaded in 259 at Carthage (modern Tunis, Tunisia)

http://catholicsaints.info/martyrs-of-carthage-23-may/


Martyrs of Mesopotamia

Profile

A group of Christians martyred in Mesopotamia in persecutions by imperial Roman authorities. Their names and the details of their lives have not come down to us.

Died

suffocated over a slow fire in Mesopotamia

http://catholicsaints.info/martyrs-of-mesopotamia/


Martyrs of North Africa

Profile

A group of 19 Christians martyred together in the persecutions of the Arian Vandal King Hunneric for refusing to deny the Trinity. We know little more than a few of their names - Dionysius, Julian, Lucius, Paul and Quintian.

Died

c.430

http://catholicsaints.info/martyrs-of-north-africa-23-may/


Also celebrated but no entry yet

• Christopher Soler
• Garcia of Cardenas
• Giulio of Porto
• Pontius of Condat
• Raymond Folch
• Strofan of Cluan-Mor


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