23 April • yesterday
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tomorrow
Optional Memorial of Saint George, Martyr; Optional Memorial of Saint Adalbert, Bishop and Martyr

Saint George

Also known as

• JirĂ­, Jordi, Zorzo
• Victory Bringer

Additional Memorials

• 3 November (Russian Orthodox)
• fourth Sunday in June (Malta)
• third Sunday in July (Gozo)
• 23 November (Georgia)

Profile

Soldier. Martyr. That's all we know for sure.

Several stories have been attached to Saint George, the best known of which is the Golden Legend. In it, a dragon lived in a lake near Silena, Libya. Whole armies had gone up against this fierce creature, and had gone down in painful defeat. The monster ate two sheep each day; when mutton was scarce, lots were drawn in local villages, and maidens were substituted for sheep. Into this country came Saint George. Hearing the story on a day when a princess was to be eaten, he crossed himself, rode to battle against the serpent, and killed it with a single blow with his lance. George then held forth with a magnificent sermon, and converted the locals. Given a large reward by the king, George distributed it to the poor, then rode away.

Due to his chivalrous behavior (protecting women, fighting evil, dependence on faith and might of arms, largesse to the poor), devotion to Saint George became popular in the Europe after the 10th century. In the 15th century his feast day was as popular and important as Christmas. Many of his areas of patronage have to do with life as a knight on horseback. The celebrated Knights of the Garter are actually Knights of the Order of Saint George. The shrine built for his relics at Lydda, Palestine was a popular point of pilgrimage for centuries. One of the Fourteen Holy Helpers.

Died

tortured and beheaded c.304 at Lydda, Palestine

Patronage

• against herpes • against leprosy • against plague • against skin diseases • against skin rashes • against syphilis • agricultural workers • Aragon • archers • armourers • Boy Scouts • butchers • Canada • Cappadocia • Catalonia • cavalry • chivalry • Crusaders • England • equestrians • Ethiopia • farmers • field hands • field workers • Georgia • Germany • Greece • halberdiers • horsemen • horses • husbandmen • knights • lepers • Lithuania • Malta • Montenegro • Order of the Garter • Palestine • Palestinian Christians • Portugal • riders • Romanian Army • saddle makers • saddlers • Serbia • sheep • shepherds • soldiers • Teutonic Knights • 2 dioceses • 181 cities •

Representation

• armor
• banner
• buckler
• dragon
• horse

Storefront

medals, pendants, holy cards, statues

Readings

Saint George was a man who abandoned one army for another: he gave up the rank of tribune to enlist as a soldier for Christ. Eager to encounter the enemy, he first stripped away his worldly wealth by giving all he had to he poor. Then, free and unencumbered, bearing the shield of faith, he plunged into the think of the battle, an ardent soldier for Christ. Clearly what he did serves to teach us a valuable lesson: if we are afraid to strip ourselves of out worldly possessions, then we are unfit to make a strong defense of the faith. Dear brothers, let us not only admire the courage of this fighter in heaven's army, but follow his example. Let us be inspired to strive for the reward of heavenly glory. We must now cleanse ourselves, as Saint Paul tells us, from all defilement of body and spirit, so that one day we too may deserve to enter that temple of blessedness to which we now aspire. - from a sermon by Saint Peter Damian

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-george/


Blessed Maria Gabriella Sagheddu

Also known as

• Maria Gabriella
• Mary-Gabrielle Sagheddu

Profile

Born to a family of shepherds. As a child she was described as obstinate, critical, protesting, and rebellious - but loyal, and obedient; she would say no to a request - but act on it at once. At 18 she became gentler, her temper abated, she became involved in prayer and charity, and joined "Azione Cattolic," a Catholic youth movement. At 21 she entered the Trappestine monastery of Grottaferrata. When she was accepted, her attitude finally became "Now do what You will." When the community's leader explained a request for prayer and offering for the great cause of Christian Unity, Maria Gabriella felt compelled to offer her young life to the cause. Though she'd never been sick before, she suddenly developed tuberculosis. In a mere 15 months spent in prayer for Unity, it took her to her death.

Born

17 March 1914 at Dorgali, Sardinia, Italy

Died

• 23 April 1939 during Vespers of tuberculosis
• body found incorrupt in 1957
• relics in a chapel at the Monastero Trappiste Vitorchiano near Viterbo, Italy

Beatified

25 January 1983 by Pope John Paul II

Patronage

• against bodily ills or sickness
• against death of parents
• against impoverishment or poverty
• ecumenism
• sick people

Readings

My life is of no value. I can offer it in peace. - Blessed Maria Gabriella

Praying for unity is not a matter reserved only to those who actually experience the lack of unity among Christians. In the deep personal dialogue which each of us must carry on with the Lord in prayer, concern for unity cannot be absent. Only in this way, in fact, will that concern fully become part of the reality of our life and of commitments we have taken on in the Church. It was in order to reaffirm this duty that I set before the faithful of the Catholic Church a model which I consider exemplary, the model of a Trappistine Sister, Blessed Maria Gabriella of Unity, whom I beatified on 25 January 1983. Sister Maria Gabriella, called by her vocation to be apart from the world, devoted her life to meditation and prayer centered on Chapter 17 of Saint John's Gospel and offered her life for Christian Unity. This is truly the cornerstone of all prayer: the total and unconditional offering of one's life to the Father; through the Son, in the Holy Spirit. The example of Sister Mara Gabriella is instructive; it helps us to understand that there are no special times, situations, or places of prayer for unity. Christ's prayer to the Father is offered as a model for everyone, always and everywhere. - John Paul II, from Ut unum sint, 1995

In simplicity of heart I gladly offer everything, O Lord. The Lord put me on this path, he will remember to sustain me in battle. To His mercy I entrust my frailty. I saw in front of me a big cross…, I thought that my sacrifice was nothing in comparison to His. I offered myself entirely and I do not withdraw the given word. God's will whatever it may be, this is my joy, my happiness, my peace. I will never be able to thank enough. I cannot say but these words:" My God, your Glory." - Blessed Maria Gabriella

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-maria-gabriella-sagheddu/


Blessed Teresa Maria of the Cross

Also known as

• Bettina (childhood nickname)
• Teresa Adelaide Cesina Manetti
• Teresa Maria de la Cruz
• Teresa Maria della Croce
• Teresa Maria Manetti

Profile

Daughter of Salvatore Manetti and Rosa Bigagli, Teresa had one brother, Adamo Raffaello; she lived her whole life in her small village, and her father died when Teresa was three years old. She was always known as a pious child, and made her First Communion on 8 May 1859. A natural organizer, when she was 18 years old Teresa gathered a group of young women who lived in common and worked as teachers of poor children; they were inspired by the writings of Saint Teresa of Avila, and had a special devotion to her. She organized and joined a group of Carmelite tertiaries on 16 July 1876, taking the name Teresa Maria of the Cross. Joined the Discalced Carmelites on 12 July 1888. Over the next few years she started schools in several Italian cities, each with it's little group of Carmelite teachers. Her Institute of teaching nuns received approval from Pope Saint Pius X on 27 February 1904 as the Suor Carmelite di Santa Teresa di Firenze (CSTF; Carmelite Sisters of Saint Teresa of Florence) with a mission to teach and care for children, especially orphans. Like her inspiration, Saint Teresa of Avila, Teresa of the Cross met with much resistance to her work with the poor, much slander about her personal life, and a long period of spiritual dryness, but all who met her commented on the air of joy and peace she brought to her work.

Born

2 March 1846 at Campi Bisenzio, Florence, Italy as Teresa Adelaide Cesina Manetti

Died

• 3 April 1910 at Campi Bisenzio, Florence, Italy of natural causes
• relics translated to the monastery church at Campi Bisenzio on 22 April 1912

Beatified

19 October 1986 by Pope John Paul II

Patronage

people ridiculed for their piety

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-teresa-maria-of-the-cross/


Saint Adalbert of Prague

Also known as

• Adalbert of Praha
• Apostle of Bohemia
• Apostle of the Prussians
• Apostle of the Slavs
• Adalberto, Adelbert, Adalbert, Voitech, Voytech, Voytiekh

Profile

Born to the Bohemian nobility. He took the name of Saint Adalbert of Magdeburg, the archbishop who healed, educated and converted him. Bishop of Prague (in the modern Czech Republic on 10 February 982. Friend of Emperor Otto III. Adalbert encouraged the evangelization of the Magyars, and worked on it with Saint Astricus. Opposed by the nobility in Prague and unpopular in the area, he withdrew to Rome, Italy and became a Benedictine monk, making his vows on 17 April 990; Pope John XV sent him back to Prague. anyway. Founded the monastery of Brevnov. Met more opposition from the nobility, and returned to Rome. There being no hope of his working in Prague, he was allowed to (unsuccessfully) evangelize in Pomerania, Poland, Prussia, Hungary, and Russia. He and his fellow missionaries were martyred by Prussians near Koenigsberg or Danzig at the instigation of a pagan priest. Not long before his death, Adalbert met and was a great inspiration to Saint Boniface of Querfurt.

Born

c.957 in Libice nad Cidlinou, Bohemia (part of modern Czech Republic) as Voytech

Died

• struck in the head on 23 April 997 in Pomerania near Danzig (in modern Poland)
• relics forcibly taken to Prague in 1039

Canonized

999

Patronage

• Bohemia
• Czech Republic
• Poland
• archdiocese of Prague, Czech Republic
• Prussia

Representation

• holding a two-headed cross, two lances, and a club
• holding a lance with a club at the lower end
• pierced by three lances and beheaded
• baptizing Saint Stephen of Hungary
• chains at his feet
• angels carrying him to heaven
• stabbed with a lance

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-adalbert-of-prague/


Blessed Adalbert III of Salzburg

Profile

Son of King Ladislas II of Bohemia and Gertrude of Austria; grand-son of Emperor Henry IV. Norbertine monk. Canon of the Stahov monastery. Deacon. Archbishop of Salzburg, Austria in 1168. The position included secular power as well as ecclesiastical, and Adalbert began exercising his authority without formal approval of the Emperor. The Emperor considered this an offense, and briefly replaced Adalbert as bishop. Adalbert struggled to regain his authority, and to win allies he unlawfully gave away Church property; his priests petitioned for a new election for archbishop, but Pope Alexander III supported Adalbert. Through a series of political maneuvers, Adalbert managed to keep his see until formally deposed in May 1174. Re-elected Archbishop of Salzburg on 19 September 1183, this time with the emperor's support, and this time he held the see until his death, this time taking seriously his duties as shepherd of the Church and parishioners.

Born

1145 in Bohemia

Died

• 8 April 1200 in Salzburg, Austria of natural causes
• buried in front of the Saint Andrew altar in the cathedral of Salzburg

Beatified

• no formal Vatican beatification
• devotion began within the Premonstratensians soon after his death

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-adalbert-iii-of-salzburg/


Saint Gerard of Toul

Also known as

Gerhard

Profile

Born to the nobility, he was known as a pious boy, and received a good education in Cologne, Germany. Priest. Following the death of his mother by a lightning strike, Gerard wanted a life of quiet prayer and penance, and became canon of the cathedral in Cologne. His reputation for piety spread, however, and he was chosen bishop of Toul, France on 3 March 963. Fought to prevent secular authority from interfering in Church matters. Rebuilt the cathedral there, and established many religious houses in his diocese. The houses had associated schools taught by Greek and Irish monks. Noted for his active prayer life and endless study of scripture and the saints, and as an effective preacher who did extensive work with the poor.

Born

935 at Cologne, Germany

Died

• 23 April 994 in Toul, France
• interred in the choir loft of the Cathedral of Toul

Canonized

1050 by Pope Leo IX

Patronage

Gerardmer, France

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-gerard-of-toul/


Blessed Helen del Cavalcanti

Also known as

• Helen Valentini
• Helen of Udine
• Helena Valentini of Udine

Profile

Daughter of Count Maniago. Married at age 15 to a knight named Anthony del Cavalcanti. Happily married for 25 years, and mother of several children. Widow. Augustinian tertiary, noted for her charity and austerity. Took a vow of silence, speaking only on Christmas night. Had an ongoing fight with worldly temptation, and given to ecstatic trances. Had the gift of healing. Spent her last three years bed-ridden; she preferred a pallet of stones and straw to a bed.

Born

at Udine, Italy

Died

• 23 April 1458 of natural causes
• relics in the cathedral of Udine, Italy

Beatified

27 September 1848 by Pope Pius IX (cultus confirmed)

Patronage

• against temptations
• widows

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-helen-del-cavalcanti/


Saint Pusinna of Champagne

Profile

She lived many of her adult years as a hermit in her parent's house. Hermitess in Binson, Chalons-en-Champagne, France.

Born

5th-century Corbie, France

Died

• 6th century in Binson, Chalons-en-Champagne, France
• buried near her hermitage in Binson
• relics transferred to the Herford Abbey in Germany in 860
• relics transferred to the Wundhusen Abbey in Thale
• relics transferred to Quidlinburg Abbey
• some relics transferred to the cathedral in Herford, Germany in 1490
• relics re-discovered and re-enshrined in 1854 during renovation of the cathedral tower
• some relics transferred to the church of Saint John the Baptist in Herford; they were re-enshrined under the church chancel altar in 2007
• some relics taken to Paderborn Cathedral, and to parish churches in Herford and Heddinghausen on 9 January 1944

Patronage

Herford, Germany

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-pusinna-of-champagne/


Blessed Giorgio di Suelli

Also known as

George Suelli

Profile

Born to a family of house slaves. Granted his freedom in order to persue a vocation to the priesthood. Bishop of Suelli, Italy. Known for his personal piety, his concern to be a pastor to his people, and as a miracle worker.

Born

• 11th century Cagliari, Italy
• his mothers had been childless, it was late in her life, and she was visited in a dream by an angel who foretold the birth

Died

• 23 April 1117 at Suelli, Italy of natural causes
• buried at the Suelli cathedral

Beatified

1609 by Pope Paul V

Patronage

• against famine
• Lanusei, Italy, diocese of
• Suelli, Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-giorgio-di-suelli/


Saint Ibar of Meath

Also known as

Iberius, Ibhar, Ivor

Profile

Uncle and teacher of Saint Abban. disciple of Saint Patrick. Missionary in south Ireland with Saint Kiaran, Saint Ailbe, Saint Declan and others. Preached in Leinster and Meath. About 480 he settled at Begerin where he built an oratory and cell; his holiness attracted many would-be students. He founded Beggery Monstary on the island of Beg-Eire, and served as its abbot. Bishop of Begerin, Wexford, Ireland. Spiritual director of Saint Brigid's convent at Kildare, Ireland.

Born

5th century Ulster, Ireland

Died

c.500 of natural causes

Patronage

Begerin, Ireland

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-ibar-of-meath/


Blessed Giles of Assisi

Also known as

Aegidius

Profile

Friend and third follower of Saint Francis of Assisi. Sent as a missionary to Muslims in Tunis, but had no success. Upon his return, he lived at various places in Italy where for the rest of his days he was in demand as a spiritual advisor; his "Sayings" have been printed in many editions. Assigned later to the hermitage of Fabriano where he led a life of quiet contemplation.

Born

c.1190 in Assisi, Umbria, Papal States (in modern Italy)

Died

23 April 1262 at Perugia, Italy of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-giles-of-assisi/


Saint Marolus of Milan

Profile

Grew up in Syria. Moving to Rome, Italy where he became a good friend of Pope Innocent I. Bishop of Milan, Italy in 408. Worked with refugees and victims of a Visigoth invasion of his diocese.

Born

Mesopotamia

Died

• 23 April 423 of natural causes
• buried in the Church of Saint Nazarius and Celsus in Milan, Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-marolus-of-milan/


Saint Fortunatus of Vienne

Profile

Deacon. Sent by Saint Irenaeus of Lyons to evangelize around Vienne, France. Martyr.

Died

scourged, had their legs crushed, were bound to wheels in motion, stifled with smoke while stretched on the rack, and finally run through with a sword in 212 at Valence, France

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-fortunatus-of-vienne/


Saint Achilleus of Vienne

Profile

Deacon. Sent by Saint Irenaeus of Lyons to evangelize around Vienne, France. Martyr.

Died

scourged, had their legs crushed, were bound to wheels in motion, stifled with smoke while stretched on the rack, and finally run through with a sword in 212 at Valence, France

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-achilleus-of-vienne/


Saint Felix of Vienne

Profile

Priest. Sent by Saint Irenaeus of Lyons to evangelize around Vienne, France. Martyr.

Died

scourged, had their legs crushed, were bound to wheels in motion, stifled with smoke while stretched on the rack, and finally run through with a sword in 212 at Valence, France

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-felix-of-vienne/


Saint George of San Giorio

Also known as

Georg, Giorgio, Giorio, Jorio

Profile

Martyr. Later writers associate him with the Theban Legion, but they were in an entirely different location.

Died

c.286 in San Giorio, Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-george-of-san-giorio/


Blessed Giles of Saumur

Profile

Chaplain to King Saint Louis IX. Accompanied the king on Crusade. Bishop of Damietta, Egypt in 1243. Archbishop of Tyre, Lebanon in 1245.

Died

1266 at Dinant, Belgium of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-giles-of-saumur/


Blessed Gerard of Orchimont

Profile

Benedictine monk. Abbot in Florennes, Belgium from 1126 to 1136.

Died

1138 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-gerard-of-orchimont/


Martyrs of Africa

Profile

A group of Christians murdered for their faith in northern Africa. Little information has survived but their names. The ones we know are - Catulinus, Chorus, Faustinus, Felicis, Felix, Nabors, Plenus, Salunus, Saturninus, Silvius, Solutus, Theodora, Theodorus, Theon, Ursus, Valerius, Venustus, Victorinus, Victurus, Vitalis

http://catholicsaints.info/martyrs-of-africa/


Also celebrated but no entry yet

• French Mercedarian Martyrs
• Martyrs of Rome
• Alexandra of Rome
• Ethelred of the West Saxons
• Euglogius of Edessa
• Sebastian de Riccafont


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