14 November • yesterday
• prayers
• tomorrow

Of all the gifts of the Holy Spirit the principal is the grace to conquer self, and wil lingly to suffer injuries for the love of God. - Saint Francis of Assisi


We often lose a treasure of inestimable price for a little vainglory or some paltry honour; and thus it happens that the Bene factor ceases to bestow His gifts. - Saint Francis of Assisi


When the servant of God is a prey to sadness he ought at once to have recourse to prayer, and remain in all humility before his Father and Lord until He restores to him the joy of his salvation. - Saint Francis of Assisi


Blessed John Licci

Also known as

John Liccio

Profile

Born to a poor farmer, John's mother died in childbirth. His life from then on, all 111 years, was a tale of miracles.

John's father, who fed the baby on crushed pomegranates, had to work the fields, and was forced to leave the infant alone. The baby began crying, and a neighbor woman took him to her home to feed him. She laid the infant on the bed next to her paralyzed husband - and the man was instantly cured. The woman told John's father of the miracle, but he was more concerned that she was meddling, and had taken his son without his permission. He took the child home to feed him more pomegranate pulp. As soon as the child was removed from the house, the neighbor's paralysis returned; when John was brought back in, the man was healed. Even John's father took this as a sign, and allowed the neighbors to care for John.

A precocious and emotional child, John began reciting the Daily Offices before age 10. While on a trip to Palermo, Italy at age 15, John went to Confession in the church of Saint Zita of Lucca where his confession was heard by Blessed Peter Geremia who suggested John consider a religious life. John considered himself unworthy, but Peter pressed the matter, John joined the Dominicans in 1415, and wore the habit for 96 years, the longest period known for anyone.

Priest. Founded the convent of Saint Zita in Caccamo, Italy. Lacking money for the construction, John prayed for guidance. During his prayer he had a vision of an angel who told him to "build on the foundations that were already built." The next day in the nearby woods he found the foundation for a church called Saint Mary of the Angels, a church that had been started many years before, but had never been finished. John assumed this was the place indicated, and took over the site.

During the construction, workmen ran out of materials; the next day at dawn a large ox-drawn wagon arrived at the site. The driver unloaded a large quantity of stone, lime and sand - then promptly disappeared, leaving the oxen and wagon behind for the use of the convent. At another point a well got in the way of construction; John blessed it, and it immediately dried up; when construction was finished, he blessed it again, and the water began to flow. When roof beams were cut too short, John would pray over them, and they would stretch. There were days when John had to miraculously multiply bread and wine to feed the workers. Once a young boy came to the construction site to watch his uncle set stones; the boy fell from a wall, and was killed; John prayed over him, and restored him to life and health.

John and two brother Dominicans who were working on the convent were on the road near Caccamo when they were set upon by bandits. One of the thieves tried to stab John with a dagger; the man's hand withered and became paralyzed. The gang let the brothers go, then decided to ask for their forgiveness. John made the Sign of the Cross at them, and the thief's hand was made whole.

One Christmas a nearby farmer offered to pasture the oxen that had come with the disappearing wagon-driver. John declined, saying the oxen had come far to be there, and there they should stay. Thinking he was doing good, the layman took them anyway. When he put them in the field with his own oxen, they promptly disappeared; he later found them at the construction site, contentedly munching dry grass near Father John.

While he did plenty of preaching in his 90+ years in the habit, usually on Christ's Passion, John was not known as a great homilist. He was known, however, for his miracles and good works. His blessing caused the breadbox of a nearby widow to stay miraculously full, feeding her and her six children. His blessing prevented disease from coming to the cattle of his parishioners. Noted healer, curing at least three people whose heads had been crushed in accidents. Dominican Provincial of Sicily. Prior of the abbey on several occasions.

Born

1400 at Caccamo, diocese of Palermo, Sicily, Italy

Died

14 November 1511 of natural causes

Beatified

25 April 1753 by Pope Benedict XIV (cultus confirmed)

Patronage

• against head injuries
• Caccamo, Italy

Storefront

medals and pendants

Readings

Loving God, you made Blessed John illustrious by a complete self-denial and the utmost zeal for charity that he might reveal the mystery of your love to the poor. By following his example may we seek to please you and aid our brothers and sisters in Christ. We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. - General Calendar of the Order of Preachers

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-john-licci/


Saint Lawrence O'Toole

Also known as

• Laurence O'Toole
• Lorcan Ua Tuathail

Profile

Son of the chief of Hy Murray. Taken as a hostage by King Dermot McMurrogh Leinster in 1138 when he was ten years old; Dermot later married Lawrence's sister Mor. He was released in 1140 at age twelve to the Bishop of Glendalough, Ireland. and raised and educated at the monastic school there. Monk at Glendalough, and then abbot in 1153. Declined the bishopric of Glendalough in 1160, citing his unworthiness. Ordered to accept the archbishopric of Dublin, Ireland in 1161, he became the first native-born Irishman to hold the see.

Reformed much of the administration and clerical life in his diocese. Worked to restore and rebuild Christ Church cathedral. As archbishop he accepted the imposition onto Ireland of the English form of liturgy in 1172. Noted for his personal austerity, he wore a hair shirt under his ecclesiastical robes, made an annual 40 day retreat in Saint Kevin's cave, never ate meat, fasted every Friday, and never drank wine - though he would color his water to make it look like wine and not bring attention to himself at table. Acted as peacemaker and mediator at the second seige of Dublin in 1170.

In 1171 he travelled to Canterbury, England on diocesan business. While preparing for Mass there he was attacked by a lunatic who wanted to make Lawrence another Saint Thomas Beckett. Everyone in the church thought Lawrence had been killed by the severe blow to the head. Instead he asked for water, blessed it, and washed the wound; the bleeding stopped, and the archbishop celebrated Mass.

Negotiated the 1175 Treaty of Windsor which made upstart Irish king Rory O'Connor and vassal of king Henry II of England, but ended combat. Attended the General Lateran Council in Rome, Italy in 1179. Papal legate to Ireland. Died while travelling with King Henry II, a trip taken as a peacemaker and on behalf of Rory O'Conner. It resulted in his imprisonment and ill-treatment by the king who decided he had had his fill of meddling priests.

Born

1128 at Castledermot, County Kildare, Ireland

Died

• 14 November 1180 at Eu, diocese of Rouen, Normandy, France of natural causes
• buried at the abbey church at Eu
• so many miracles were reported at his tomb that his relics were soon translated a place of honour before the altar
• his heart was removed and returned to Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin, Ireland

Canonized

1225 by Pope Honorius III

Patronage

archdiocese of Dublin, Ireland

Video

YouTube PlayList

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-lawrence-otoole/


Blessed Maria Teresa of Jesus

Also known as

Maria Scrilli

Profile

An unknown illness kept the young Maria bedridden for two years; she was cured following a vision of Saint Fiorenzo, and soon after she felt a call to the religious life. On 28 May 1846 she entered the monastery of Saint Mary Magdalene de' Pazzi, Florence, Italy, and though she loved the cloistered life, she realized it was not her calling, and left after two months. Carmelite tertiary, taking the name Maria Teresa of Jesus. Back home she began teaching secular and religious topics to local girls, and effectively started a small school for them. While looking for a place to start a formal school, she was asked by a town council to take over a local school; she did and it formed the base for a religious institute. On 15 October 1854 she founded as the Sisters of Our Lady of Mount Carmel, but on 30 November 1859, during a period of anti-clerical sentiment in Italy, her institute was ordered to be dissolved and the school secularized. It took years of work and waiting, but on 18 March 1878 Mother Maria was able to resurrect her community, this time in Florence, Italy where they ran a school, boarding house, and Marian association, and lived a vocation of teaching, parish work, and visiting the sick. Today the Institute has about 250 sisters spread through Italy, Brazil, India, Indonesia, Israel, Poland, Canada, the Philippines, the United States, and the Czech Republic, teaching, catechising, caring for the sick and aged.

Born

15 May 1825 in Montevarchi, Arezzo, Italy as Maria Scrilli

Died

14 November 1889 in Florence, Italy of natural causes

Beatified

• 8 October 2006 by Pope Benedict XVI
• recognition celebrated by Cardinal José Saraiva Martins at the Roman Amphitheater, Fiesole, Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-maria-teresa-of-jesus/


Saint Serapion of Algiers

Also known as

• Serapion of England
• Serapio of...

Profile

As a boy he accompanied his father in the Third Crusade, and was at the battle of Acre in 1191. Member of the Order of Our Lady of Ransom, received into the Order by Saint Peter Nolasco at Barcelona, Spain in 1222. Worked with Saint Raymond Nonnatus to free 150 Christian slaves in 1229. Assigned to recruit for the Order in England, his ship was captured by pirates, and Serapion was left for dead. He survived, however, and wandered the area of London, England preaching against the theft and abuse of Church property which was happening in that area; he was ordered to leave London, and spent some time as a wandering evangelist in the British Isles. In 1240 he took a ransom to release 87 Christians held in Algiers by Muslims, and when the captors demanded more money, he volunteered to stay as a hostage until it arrived. He then worked as a missionary, converting many to Christianity. Authorities then tortured, scourged, abused and executed him. Martyr.

Born

c.1179 in London, England

Died

crucified, stabbed and dismembered alive in Algeria in 1240

Canonized

14 April 1728 by Pope Benedict XIII

Patronage

• against arthritis
• Azul, Argentina, diocese of

Representation

young Mercedarian tied to a cross

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-serapion-of-algiers/


Saint Siard

Profile

Born to the nobility of Friesland (an area of modern Netherlands). Studied at the abbey school of Mariëngaarde, Friesland. Spiritual student of Frederick of Hallum. Joined the Premonstratensians in the early 1170's. Abbot at the house in Mariëngaarde in 1194 where he served for 36 years. Noted for his adherence to the Norbertine rule, his love of the contemplative life, for his generosity to the poor, and as a peacemaker. Had a devotion of the Saint Mary and Saint Martha of Bethany, and gave them as examples to his brothers.

Died

• 1230 at the abbey of Mariëngaarde, Friesland of natural causes
• relics moved to Hildesheim, Germany in 1578 when the abbey was destroyed by Calvinists
• relics placed in new reliquaries in 1608
• some relics taken to Tongerlo abbey at Westerlo, Belgium in 1617
• some relics taken to the abbey of Saint-Feuillin, Roeulz, France in 1617
• the abbey of Saint-Feuillin was suppressed in the French Revolution and the relics were taken to the church of Strépy
• some relics transferred to the abbey of Windberg, Germany in 2000

Beatified

8 March 1728 by Pope Benedict XIII (cultus confirmation)

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-siard/


Saint Nikola Tavelic

Also known as

• Nikola Tavigli
• Nicholas, Nicola

Profile

Franciscan friar. Priest. Missionary to Bosnia for 12 years; reports of the day say that the friars brought 50,000 to Christianity. Missionary to Palestine in 1384. Martyred by the Muslim authorities.

Born

c.1340 in Sibenik, Sibensko-Kninska, Croatia

Died

burned alive on 14 November 1391 near the Jaffa Gate in Jerusalem

Beatified

• 6 June 1889 by Pope Leo XIII (cultus confirmation)
• 12 June 1966 by Pope Paul VI (decree of martyrdom)

Canonized

• 21 June 1970 by Pope Paul VI
• the first Croatian saint canonized in the modern process

Video

YouTube PlayList

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-nikola-tavelic/


Blessed Maria Louise Merkert

Also known as

Maria Luiza Merkert

Profile

Second and last daughter born to Anthony Merkert and Maria Barbara Pfitzner, she was raised in a pious, middle-class family. Her father died when Maria was still a baby. She and her sister grew to both be devoted to care for the poor. Co-founder in 1842 of the Sisters of Saint Elizabeth in Nelsse, Prussia, to tend in their own homes, without compensation, helpless sick persons who could not or would not be received into the hospitals; she served as their first superior until her death.

Born

21 September 1817 in Nysa, Opolskie, Poland (formerly in the Breslau region of Germany

Died

14 November 1872 in Nysa, Opolskie, Poland of typhus

Beatified

20 September 2007 by Pope Benedict XVI

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-maria-louise-merkert/


Saint Dubricius of Wales

Also known as

• Dubricius of Caerleon
• Dubricius of Llandaff
• Devereux, Dubric, Dubrice, Dubricus, Dubritius, Dybrig, Dyffryg, Dyfrig

Profile

Related to Saint Brychan of Brycheiniog. One of the founders of monastic life in Wales. He founded monasteries in Gwent and England with his main centers in Henllan and Moccas. Worked with Saint Teilo of Llandaff and Saint Samson of York who he appointed as abbot on Caldey Island. Bishop of Llandaff, Wales, consecrated in by Saint Germanus of Auxerre. Archbishop of Caerleon, Wales, a seat he turned over to Saint David of Wales. In his later years he retired to the Isle of Bardsey to live as a prayerful hermit.

Born

Wales

Died

c.545 on the Isle of Bardsey, Wales of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-dubricius-of-wales/


Saint Etienne-Théodore Cuenot

Also known as

Stephen-Theodore Cuenot

Profile

Priest, ordained in 1825. Member of the Paris Foreign Missions Society. Missionary to Vietnam in 1828. Missionary bishop in 1835. Vicar apostolic of Cochinchina in 1840. Martyred in the persecutions of emperor Tu Duc.

Born

8 February 1802 in Le Bélieu, Doubs, France

Died

14 November 1861 in an elephant stable in Bình Ðinh, Vietnam

Canonized

19 June 1988 by Pope John Paul II

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-etienne-theodore-cuenot/


Saint Antigius of Langres

Also known as

Anthôt, Antidius, Antège, Autige

Profile

Itinerant missionary bishop who evangelized in the area of Langres, France.

Died

• in Saint-Anthot, France of natural causes
• buried in Saint-Anthot
• relics moved to Chiney, France due to invading Normans
• relics moved to Italy in January 887 due to invading Normans
• relics later moved to the monastery of San Faustino e San Giovita in Brescia, Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-antigius-of-langres/


Saint Hypatius of Gangra

Also known as

Hipacy, Hypatia, Ipazio

Profile

Bishop of Gangra, Paphlagonia (modern Çankiri, Turkey). Attended the Council of Nicea where he fiercely defended the divinity of Christ. When he returned home, he was martyred by a group of Novatian heretics who opposed his view.

Died

stoned to death c.325 at Gangra, Paphlagonia (modern Çankiri, Turkey)

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-hypatius-of-gangra/


Saint Alberic of Utrecht

Profile

Nephew of Saint Gregory of Utrecht. Friend of Blessed Alcuin. Benedictine monk in Utrecht, Netherlands. Prior of the cathedral of Utrecht. Noted for his encyclopedic knowledge of the faith, his joy for living in Christ, and his zeal for bringing both to any who would listen. Bishop of Utrecht in 775. Reorganized the school of Utrecht, directed the mission of Ludger in Ostergau, and worked to evangelize the pagan Teutons.

Died

21 August 784 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-alberic-of-utrecht/


Saint John Osorinus

Also known as

• John of Trau
• John of Trogir
• Johannes von Trogir
• Ivan Trogirski

Profile

Hermit at an Camaldolese monastery. First bishop of Trogir (in modern Croatia) c.1070. Heped defend the city from king Coloman.

Died

• c.1111
• buried in the Saint Lawrence cathedral, Trogir, Croatia

Patronage

Trogir, Croatia

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-john-osorinus/


Saint Venerando the Centurian

Also known as

Venerable the Centurian

Profile

Roman centurian. Convert to Christianity. Martyr.

Died

• interred in the catacombs of San Callisto, Rome, Italy
• relics translated to Grotte Santo Stefano, Italy

Patronage

Grotte Santo Stefano, Italy

Representation

Roman centurian holding a lily

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-venerando-the-centurian/


Saint Pierre of Narbonne

Profile

Franciscan friar. Priest. Missionary to Palestine in 1384. Martyred by the Muslim authorities.

Born

Narbonne, Aude, France

Died

burned alive on 14 November 1391 near the Jaffa Gate in Jerusalem

Beatified

12 June 1966 by Pope Paul VI (decree of martyrdom)

Canonized

21 June 1970 by Pope Paul VI

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-pierre-of-narbonne/


Saint Serapion of Alexandria

Profile

A man very public about his faith, Serapion was abused and killed in anti-Christian riots during the persecutions of Septimius Severus. Martyr.

Died

thrown off the roof of his own home in 252 in Alexandria, Egypt

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-serapion-of-alexandria-14-november/


Blessed Jean of Tufara

Also known as

• Jean of Tupharia
• Jean of Tufaria
• John of...

Profile

Hermit. Helped found the Benedictine monastery of Santa Maria de Gualdo Mazocca near Campobasso, Italy in the late 1150's.

Died

14 November 1170 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-jean-of-tufara/


Saint Déodat of Rodez

Profile

Franciscan friar. Priest. Missionary to Palestine in 1384. Martyred by the Muslim authorities.

Born

Rodez, Aveyron, France

Died

burned alive on 14 November 1391 near the Jaffa Gate in Jerusalem

Canonized

21 June 1970 by Pope Paul VI

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-deodat-of-rodez/


Saint Stefano of Cuneo

Profile

Franciscan friar. Priest. Missionary to Palestine in 1384. Martyred by the Muslim authorities.

Born

Cuneo, Italy

Died

burned alive on 14 November 1391 near the Jaffa Gate in Jerusalem

Canonized

21 June 1970 by Pope Paul VI

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-stefano-of-cuneo/


Saint Adeltrude of Aurillac

Also known as

Adaltrude of Aurillac

Profile

Born

c.830 in France

Died

c.879

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-adeltrude-of-aurillac/


Saint Ruf of Avignon

Profile

Fourth century missionary to Avignon, France. He was the first to lead a Christian community there, and has long been considered the first bishop of Avignon.

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-ruf-of-avignon/


Saint Jucundus of Bologna

Profile

Bishop of Bologna, Italy.

Died

485 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-jucundus-of-bologna/


Saint Modanic

Profile

Eighth century bishop, possibly at Aberdeen, Scotland.

Born

Scottish

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-modanic/


Martyrs of Emesa

Profile

Group of Christian women tortured and executed for their faith in the persecutions of the Arab chieftain Mady.

Died

Emesa (modern Homs, Syria)

http://catholicsaints.info/martyrs-of-emesa/


Martyrs of Heraclea

Profile

Group of Christians murdered together for their faith. The only details we have are three of their names - Clementinus, Philomenus and Theodotus.

Died

Heraclea, Thrace

http://catholicsaints.info/martyrs-of-heraclea-14-november/


Also celebrated but no entry yet

• Holy Fathers of Merida


CatholicSaints.Info Portable Edition
email CatholicSaints.*