12 December • yesterday
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Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe

Our Lady of Guadalupe

Also known as

• Holy Mary of Guadalupe
• Virgin of Guadalupe
• Maria de Guadalupe

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Guadalupe is, strictly speaking, the name of a picture, but the name was extended to the church containing the picture and to the town that grew up around the church. It makes the shrine, it occasions the devotion, it illustrates Our Lady. It is taken as representing the Immaculate Conception, being the lone figure of a woman with the sun, moon, and star accompaniments of the great apocalyptic sign with a supporting angel under the crescent. The word is Spanish Arabic, but in Mexico it may represent certain Aztec sounds.

Its tradition is long-standing and constant, and in sources both oral and written, Indian and Spanish, the account is unwavering. The Blessed Virgin appeared on Saturday 9 December 1531 to a 55 year old neophyte named Juan Diego, who was hurrying down Tepeyac hill to hear Mass in Mexico City. She sent him to Bishop Zumárraga to have a temple built where she stood. She was at the same place that evening and Sunday evening to get the bishop's answer. The bishop did not immediately believed the messenger, had him cross-examined and watched, and he finally told him to ask the lady who said she was the mother of the true God for a sign. The neophyte agreed readily to ask for sign desired, and the bishop released him.

Juan was occupied all Monday with Bernardino, an uncle, who was dying of fever. Indian medicine had failed, and Bernardino seemed at death's door. At daybreak on Tuesday 12 December 1531, Juan ran to nearby the Saint James convent for a priest. To avoid the apparition and the untimely message to the bishop, he slipped round where the well chapel now stands. But the Blessed Virgin crossed down to meet him and said, "What road is this thou takest son?" A tender dialogue ensued. She reassured Juan about his uncle, to whom she also briefly appeared and instantly cured. Calling herself Holy Mary of Guadalupe she told Juan to return to the bishop. He asked Mary for the sign he required. She told him to go to the rocks and gather roses. Juan knew it was neither the time nor the place for roses, but he went and found them. Gathering many into the lap of his tilma, a long cloak or wrapper used by Mexican Indians, he came back. The Holy Mother rearranged the roses, and told him to keep them untouched and unseen until he reached the bishop. When he met with Zumárraga, Juan offered the sign to the bishop. As he unfolded his cloak the roses, fresh and wet with dew, fell out. Juan was startled to see the bishop and his attendants kneeling before him. The life size figure of the Virgin Mother, just as Juan had described her, was glowing on the tilma. The picture was venerated, guarded in the bishop's chapel, and soon after carried in procession to the preliminary shrine.

The coarsely woven material of the tilme which bears the picture is as thin and open as poor sacking. It is made of vegetable fibre, probably maguey. It consists of two strips, about seventy inches long by eighteen wide, held together by weak stitching. The seam is visible up the middle of the figure, turning aside from the face. Painters have not understood the laying on of the colours. They have deposed that the "canvas" was not only unfit but unprepared, and they have marvelled at apparent oil, water, tempera, etc. colouring in the same figure. They are left in equal admiration by the flower-like tints and the abundant gold. They and other artists find the proportions perfect for a maiden of fifteen. The figure and the attitude are of one advancing. There is flight and rest in the eager supporting angel. The chief colours are deep gold in the rays and stars, blue-green in the mantle, and rose in the flowered tunic.

Sworn evidence was given at various commissions of inquiry corroborating the traditional account of the miraculous origin and influence of the picture. Some wills connected with Juan Diego and his contemporaries were accepted as documentary evidence. Vouchers were given for the existence of Bishop Zumárraga's letter to his Franciscan brothers in Spain concerning the apparitions. His successor, Montufar, instituted a canonical inquiry, in 1556, on a sermon in which the pastors and people were abused for crowding to the new shrine. In 1568 the renowned historian Bernal Díaz, a companion of Cortez, refers incidentally to Guadalupe and its daily miracles. The lay viceroy, Enríquez, while not opposing the devotion, wrote in 1575 to Philip II asking him to prevent the third archbishop from erecting a parish or monastery at the shrine. Inaugural pilgrimages were usually made to it by viceroys and other chief magistrates. Processes, national and ecclesiastical, were laboriously formulated and attested for presentation at Rome, Italy in 1663, 1666, 1723, and 1750.

The clergy, secular and regular, has been remarkably faithful to the devotion towards Our Lady of Guadalupe, the bishops especially fostering it, even to the extent of making a protestation of faith in the miracle a matter of occasional obligation. Pope Benedict XIV decreed that Our Lady of Guadalupe should be the national patron of Mexico, and made 12 December a holiday of obligation with an octave, and ordered a special Mass and Office. Pope Leo XIII approved a complete historical second Nocturne, ordered the picture to be crowned in his name, and composed a poetical inscription for it. Pope Pius X permitted Mexican priests to say the Mass of Holy Mary of Guadalupe on the twelfth day of every month, and granted indulgences which may be gained in any part of the world for prayer before a copy of the picture.

The place, called Guadalupe Hidalgo since 1822, is three miles northeast of Mexico City. Pilgrimages have been made to this shrine almost without interruption since 1531-1532. A shrine at the foot of Tepeyac Hill served for ninety years, and still forms part of the parochial sacristy. In 1622 a rich shrine was erected, and in 1709 a newer, even richer one. There are also a parish church, a convent and church for Capuchin nuns, a well chapel, and a hill chapel all constructed in the 18th century. About 1750 the shrine got the title of collegiate, a canonry and choir service being established. It was aggregated to Saint John Lateran in 1754. In 1904 it was created a basilica, with the presiding ecclesiastic being called abbot. The shrine has been renovated in Byzantine style which presents an illustration of Guadalupan history.

Patronage

• Americas; New World
• Central America
• Mexico
• New Mexico
• Pojoaque Indian Pueblo
• 12 dioceses
• 3 cities

Storefront

books, medals, statues, rosaries, chaplets, bracelets

Video

YouTube PlayList

http://catholicsaints.info/our-lady-of-guadalupe/


Saint Spyridon of Cyprus

Also known as

• Spyridon of Corfu
• Spyridon of Korfu
• Spyridon of Kerkyra
• Spyridon of Tremithus
• Spyridon of Trimithon
• Spyridon the Wonder Worker
• Spyridon Thaumaturgos
• Spiridion...

Additional Memorial

11 August (Corfu)

Profile

Known as a pious youth as he grew up on Cyprus. Shepherd. Married, and father one of daughter. Both his wife and daughter became nuns, and he became a monk at Mount Carmel.

Bishop of Tremithus, Cyprus. Spiritual teacher of Saint Tryphillius of Leucosia. Fought Arianism. During the persecution of Galerus, his right eye was torn out, his left calf cut off, and he was sent to forced labor in the Spanish mines. The Edict of Milan eventually freed him, and allowed him to return to his see, and attended the Council of Nicaea and Council of Sardica.

Legend says that he once ordered a gold ingot to resume its true form; it immediately turned into a serpent.

Another time, while listening to a deacon read Scripture, he saw that the lector was using his speaking ability to draw attention to himself, not the word of God. He silenced the deacon who immediately developed a stammer, understood his error, and lost all desire for people to notice his diction.

Converted a prominent philosopher by using a chunk of pottery to explain the Christian concept of the trinity (Father, Son and Holy Spirit, unified but distinct). He explained that pottery is made of the three elements of earth, fire, and water, and yet is unified into a single object. During this mini-lesson, water flowed from the bottom of the shard as fire miraculously billowed from the top - hence his patronage of potters.

Born

270 on Cyprus

Died

• c.348 of natural causes
• incorrupt corpse

Patronage

• against flood
• potters
• sailors
• 3 cities in Greece

Representation

• wearing a pointed cap
• shepherd standing in a sarcophogus
• shepherd's cloak
• holding a barb or awl or something similarly pointed referring to the gouging out of his eye

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-spyridon-of-cyprus/


Saint Finnian of Clonard

Also known as

• Finian of Clonard
• Finden of Clonard
• Teacher of the Irish Saints

Profile

A pious youth, he founded three churches in Ireland while still a layman. Studied in Wales under Saint Cadoc of Llancarvan and Saint Gildas the Wise. Monk. Great admirer of Saint Patrick. Considered one of the great founders of Irish monasticism. Founded the monastery at Clonard, Meath, Ireland c.520 which lasted a thousand years, and was a training center for great Irish saints. Spiritual teacher of Saint Columba of Iona, Saint Columba of Terryglass, Saint Ciaran of Clommacnois, Saint Brendan the Voyager, Saint Nathy, Saint Nennius, Saint Ruadhan of Lorrha, Saint Daig MacCairaill, and others. Maintained close relations with the British Church. Often referred to as a bishop, there is no evidence he was ever so consecrated.

Legend attributes many miracles to him. Birds would gather around him because of his gentle holiness. Reported to have cleared parasitic insects, worms and vermin from the island of Flathlom and the regions of Nantcarfan. One story says that he fended off a party of Saxon raiders by causing an earthquake to swallow their camp.

Born

c.470 at Myshall, County Carlow, Ireland

Died

• c.549 to 552 at Clonard, Meath, Ireland of plague
• relics originally enshrined in Clonard, but were destroyed in the 9th century

Patronage

• Alexandria-Cornwall, Ontario, Canada, diocese of
• Meath, Ireland, diocese of

Storefront

medals and pendants

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-finnian-of-clonard/


Blessed Ludwik Bartosik

Also known as

• Father Pio
• Father Pius
• prisoner 12832

Additional Memorial

12 June as one of the 108 Martyrs of World War II

Profile

Eldest son of Wojciech, a poor shoemaker, and Wiktoria Tomczyk. With the help of his parish priest, Ludwik obtained a good education. Joined the Franciscan Conventual Friars in 1926, taking the name Pius. Studied in Franciscan seminaries in Sanok, then Lviv and finally Krakow, Poland. Ordained on 23 June 1935. Noted confessor at the Franciscan convent in Krosno, Poland. At the request of Saint Maximilian Kolbe, Father Pius was transferred to the convent at Niepokalanów, Poland in August 1936 where he worked in a number of positions, including editor of the magazines Knight of the Immaculate, Little Knight of the Immaculate and Miles Immaculatae, all the while continuing to serve as confessor to his brother friars. Wrote a number of works including a noted book of Mariology. Imprisoned by invading German troops on 19 September 1939 and transferred to several prisons, finally ending at the Auschwitz forced labour concentration camp. He continued his vocation as confessor to other prisoners. Martyred in the Nazi persecutions of World War II.

Born

21 August 1909 in Kokanin, Wielkopolskie, Poland

Died

tortured to death during the night of 12 to 13 December 1941 in Oswiecim (a.k.a. Auschwitz), Malopolskie, Nazi-occupied Poland

Beatified

26 March 1999 by Pope John Paul II

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-ludwik-bartosik/


Saint Vicelin of Oldenburg

Also known as

• Apostle of Holstein
• Apostle of Obodriten
• Vicelinus, Vincelin, Vizelin, Wissel, Witzel, Wizelin

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Born to the nobility and orphaned young. Studied at Hameln, Germany and in the cathedral school of Paderborn, Germany. Canon at Bremen, Germany. Teacher and principal of the school at Bremen. Spiritual student of Saint Norbert of Magdeburg who ordained him. Missionary to the Wagrian Wends in northeastern Germany in autumn 1126, and to Slavs in surrounding areas. Founded monasteries at Neumunster, Holstein, Segeberg, and Hogersdorf. In 1147 most of what he had built and done was wiped out in a series of raids by pirates; he and several of his priests fled back to the Empire. Bishop of Oldenburg, Germany in 1149; known for the spirituality of his flock, and for his good works for the poor. His last two years he suffered a painful paralysis of the right side of his body resulting from an apparent heart attack and stroke.

Born

c.1088 in the castle at Hemeln on the Weser, Lower Saxony, Germany

Died

• 12 December 1154 at Neumunster, Lorraine, France of natural causes
• re-interred in front of the altar in Bordesholm in 1332

Representation

bishop with a church sitting on his left arm

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-vicelin-of-oldenburg/


Pope Saint Callistus II

Also known as

• Calixtus II
• Guido of Burgundy

Profile

Born to the nobility. Uncle of the Queen of France, cousin of the King of England, related to the German Emperor. Benedictine monk. Archbishop of Vienne, France for over 30 years. Created cardinal by Pope Paschal II. Chosen 162nd Pope in 1119. Ended the investiture conflict. Presided over the First Lateran Council. Fought simony and concubinage of the clergy. Funded construction and beautification projects in Rome.

Born

c.1065 Quingey, France

Papal Ascension

1 February 1119

Died

13 December 1124 in Rome, Italy of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/pope-saint-callistus-i/


Saint Columba of Terryglass

Also known as

• Colum mac Crimthainn
• Colum moccu Loigse
• Columba of Tirdaglas
• Columba of Tyrdaglas

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Son of Crinthainn. Disciple of Saint Finnian of Clonard; administered Last Rites to Saint Finnian on his death-bed. Spiritual director of Saint Caemban, Saint Fintan, and Saint Mocumin. Founded the monastery of Tirdaglas (Terryglass) in 548, and served as its abbot. Visited Tours, France, and brought back relics of Saint Martin of Tours. One of the Twelve Apostles of Ireland.

Born

at Leinster, Ireland

Died

• 13 December 552 of plague
• buried in Terryglass monastery

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-columba-of-terryglass/


Saint Edburga of Thanet

Also known as

• Edburga of Minster-on-Thanet
• Bugga, Eadburga, Edburgh, Heaburg

Profile

Only daughter of King Centwine and Queen Engyth of Wessex, the 8th century royal family of Kent, England. Benedictine nun. Friend and spiritual student of Saint Mildred of Thanet. Abbess of Minster-on-Thanet Abbey in 716. She secured several royal charters for the abbey, and built a new church there. Skilled scribe and calligrapher. Pilgrim to Rome, Italy where she met Saint Boniface with whom she established a lengthy correspondence; her letters have not survived. She supported Saint Boniface in his missionary work, and copied manuscripts for his use.

Born

English

Died

• 751 at Minster-on-Thanet abbey of natural causes
• buried in the abbey church beside Saint Mildred
• relics translated to Saint Gregory's Hospital, Canterbury, England

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-edburga-of-thanet/


Saint Abra

Also known as

Abre

Profile

Daughter of Saint Hilary of Poitiers. Nun. Helped spread the faith around Poitiers, France.

Born

342

Died

360 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-abra/


Saint Agatha of Wimborne

Profile

Benedictine nun at Wimborne, England. Spiritual student of Saint Lioba of Bischofsheim with whom she travelled to Germany to help in the missionary work of Saint Boniface.

Died

790 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-agatha-of-wimborne/


Blessed Bartholomew Buonpedoni

Profile

Lay servant to the Benedictines in Pisa, Italy. Franciscan tertiary. Ordained at age 30. Village priest at Peccioli, Italy. When he contracted leprosy he gave up parish work to spend his remaining twenty years ministering to the lepers of his region, assisted by his long-time friend Blessed Vivaldus.

Born

San Geminiano, Italy

Died

1300 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-bartholomew-buonpedoni/


Saint Colman of Clonard

Also known as

• Colman moccu Thelduib
• Colmanus

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Related to Saint Finnian of Clonard. Monk. Abbot of Clonard Abbey.

Died

8 February 654 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-colman-of-clonard/


Saint Colman of Glendalough

Profile

Abbot of Glendalough, Ireland.

Died

659

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-colman-of-glendalough/


Saint Conrad of Offida

Profile

Joined the Franciscans at age 14. Noted scholar who gave up his studies to be a cook in a convent. However, his superiors knew of his speaking skills and had him leave the kitchen for the pulpit, leading to a very successful career of preaching. Died while preaching.

Born

c.1241 in Offida, diocese of Ascoli Piceno, Italy

Died

12 December 1306 at Bastia, Umbria, Italy of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-conrad-of-offida/


Saint Corentius of Quimper

Also known as

Corentin, Corentinus, Cury

Profile

Son of a British chieftain. Hermit at Plomodiern in Brittany. First bishop of Cornouaille, (modern Quimper), France, consecrated by Saint Martin. Signed the decrees of the Council of Angers in 453.

Died

c.490 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-corentius-of-quimper/


Saint Cormac

Profile

Sixth century abbot in Ireland. Friend of Saint Columba of Iona.

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-cormac/


Saint Cury

Also known as

Corentin

Profile

Fourth-century missionary from Brittany to the Cornwall area of England.

Born

Brittany, France

Died

401 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-cury/


Saint Donatus the Martyr

Profile

Martyred with 23 companions.

Died

forced into a swamp to die of cold and exhaustion, date unknown

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-donatus-the-martyr-12-december/


Saint Gregory of Terracina

Profile

Brother of Saint Speciosus. Spiritual student of Saint Benedict of Nursia. Benedictine monk at Terracina, Italy. Pope Saint Gregory the Great wrote of him in his Dialogues.

Died

c.570 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-gregory-of-terracina/


Saint Hermogenes

Profile

Martyred with 23 companions.

Died

forced into a swamp to die of cold and exhaustion

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-hermogenes/


Blessed Ida of Nivelles

Profile

Joined the Benedictine Cistercians at Kerkheim, Leuven, Belgium at age 16; the house, and Ida, were later moved to Rameige, Belgium, where she spent the rest of her life. Sister Ida was a mystic, a visionary and a miracle worker with a ministry of praying for suffering souls in Purgatory.

Born

c.1190 in Nivelles, Belgium

Died

12 December 1231 in Rameige, Belgium of natural causes

Patronage

• against toothache
• souls in Purgatory

Representation

• woman in a hospital bed holding the baby Jesus
• woman in a hosptial bed being given the baby Jesus by Mary

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-ida-of-nivelles/


Blessed James of Viterbo

Also known as

• James Capocci
• James of Naples
• Doctor Speculativus
• Giacomo, Jacobus

Profile

Augustinian hermit at Viterbo, Italy . Received his doctorate from the University of Paris. Well-known theology teacher in Paris, France and Naples, Italy. Bishop of Benevento, Italy in 1302. Archbishop of Naples, Italy in 1303.

Born

c.1255 in Viterbo, Italy as James Capocci

Died

1308 of natural causes

Beatified

14 June 1911 by Pope Pius X (cultus confirmed)

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-james-of-viterbo/


Blessed Martino Sanz

Profile

Friar and then Commander of the Mercedarian convent of Santa Maria della Mercede Arguines in Spain.

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-martino-sanz/


Saint Simon Phan Ðac Hòa

Profile

Married, father, family man, physician and mayor who worked with local charities and the missionaries working in the apostolic vicariate of Cochinchina (modern Vietnam). Imprisoned, flogged and executed for his faith in the persecutions of Minh Mang.

Born

c.1787 in Mai Vinh, Thua Thiên, Vietnam

Died

beheaded on 12 December 1840 in An Hòa, Quang Nam, Vietnam

Canonized

19 June 1988 by Pope John Paul II

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-simon-phan-dac-hoa/


Saint Synesius

Profile

Lector. Martyred in the persecutions of Aurelian.

Died

stabbed with a sword in 275 in Rome, Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-synesius/


Martyrs of Alexandria

Profile

A group of six Christians martyred for their faith during the persecutions of Decius. We know little more than five of their names - Alexander, Ammonaria, Dionysia, Epimachus and Mercuria.

Died

burned to death c.250 in Alexandria, Egypt

http://catholicsaints.info/martyrs-of-alexandria-12-december/


Martyrs of Trier

Profile

A group of Christians murdered together for their faith in the persecutions of Decius - Constantius, Crescentius, Justin and Maxentius.

Died

c.287 at Trier (in modern Germany)

http://catholicsaints.info/martyrs-of-trier-12-december/


Also celebrated but no entry yet

• Arnoldo Martin
• Bertrando de Mas
• Giovanni de Josa
• Israele di Dorat
• Pribyslava
• Therapon of Monzja
• Valerico


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