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Memorial of Saint Scholastica

Blessed Alojzije Stepinac

Also known as

Aloysius Stepinac

Profile

Raised in the large Catholic Croatian family of Josip and Barbara (nee Penic) Stepinac. Graduated high school on 28 June 1916. Soldier in the Austrian army in World War I, fighting at several points in Italy. Following the collapse of the front in September 1918, he was imprisoned, then released and demobilized in December 1918.

Studied briefly at the Faculty of Agriculture in Zagreb, Croatia, but returned to work at home. He considered marriage, but realized a call to the priesthood, and began his studies in 1924. Studied at the Pontifical Germanicum-Hungaricum College, and earned doctorates in theology and philosophy at the Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome, Italy. Ordained 26 October 1930. Parish priest in the archdiocese of Zagreb. He worked especially in the poor neighbourhoods, and established the archdiocesan Caritas on 23 November 1931.

Named Co-adjutor Archbishop of Zagreb on 29 May 1934 by Pope Pius XI. Created twelve new parishes in the archdiocese, established close ties with lay associations and youth groups, promoted the Catholic press, and helped protect the rights of the Church from the Yugoslavian state. Succeeded Archbishop Bauer on 7 December 1937.

In 1936, the rise of Nazism prompted Stepinac to support a committee helping people fleeing the Reich. Instituted the Action for Assistance to Jewish Refugees in 1938. This period galvanized him a stout defender of human rights regardless of race, religion, nationality, ethnic group or social class, a fight he would continue the rest of his days. During the war, Stepinac helped hide countless people, mainly Jews, in monasteries and other Church property; some remained there throughout the war.

By 1945, Yugoslavia had replaced the oppression of the Nazis with the oppression of the Communists. Stepinac, wrote a biographer, "treated the new authorities…in accordance with the Gospel" but fought for the rights of the Church and the interests of Croatians. After publishing a letter denouncing the execution of priests by communist militants, Stepinac was arrested for the first time.

Following the Archbishop's release, Yugoslavia's new leader, Josip Broz Tito, tried to persuade him to have the Catholic Church in Croatia break from Rome. The Bishops of Yugoslavia issued a pastoral letter on 22 September 1945 in which they referred to the promises made - and broken - by the Belgrade government to respect freedom of conscience, freedom of religion, and private ownership of property. The Bishops demanded freedom for the Catholic press, Catholic schools, religious instruction, Catholic associations, and "full freedom for the human person and his inviolable rights, full respect for Christian marriage and the restitution of all confiscated properties and institutions". The state-run media launched an attack on the Church in general, and the archbishop by name.

Stepinac was tried in September 1946 for defending the unity of the Catholic Church in Croatia, and its unity with Rome. The Pope objected to this show trial, and members of the Jewish community in the United States protested, "…this great man has been accused of being a collaborator of the Nazis. We Jews deny this…. Alojzije Stepinac was one of the few men in Europe who raised his voice against the Nazi tyranny, precisely at the time when it was most dangerous to do so." On 11 October 1946, he was sentenced to 16 years of hard labour and the loss of his civil rights, such as they were.

On 5 December 1951, ill health forced the authorities to move Stepinac from prison to house arrest in Krasic. There he performed priestly functions, received visitors, and wrote more than 5,000 letters, none of which show the slightest resentment for those who persecuted him.

Created cardinal on 12 January 1953 by Pope Pius XII who called him "an example of apostolic zeal and Christian strength. [This is] to reward his extraordinary merits…and especially to honour and comfort our sons and daughters who resolutely confess their Catholic faith despite these difficult times." This apparently was too much for the Yugoslav regime who promptly broke diplomatic relations with Rome. Stepinac, however, retained his position and maintained his stance against the bullying government until his death, which may have been a murder to eliminate an annoyance to that government.

Born

8 May 1898 at Brezaric, Krasic, Croatia as Alojzije Viktor Stepinac

Died

• 10 February 1960 at Krasic, Croatia
• suffered from polycythemia rubra vera, thrombosis of the leg and bronchial catarrh, but may have been poisoned as arsenic was found in his bones during the beatification examination

Beatified

3 October 1998 by Pope John Paul II at Marija Bistrica, Croatia

Video

YouTube PlayList

Readings

Lord, Our God, You bestowed on your servant Cardinal Alojzije Stepinac the grace to believe in Jesus Christ and also to suffer for Him with brave apostolic fervor and love towards the Church. Grant us the same faith and perseverance in suffering for the Church. Raise your servant to the glory and honor of the saints so that he may be an example and intercede for us in life's battle towards our goal of eternal salvation. Through Christ, Our Lord. Amen.

Blessed be your name, Lord! May Your will be done! - Blessed Alojzije Stepinac's last words

We always stressed in public life the principles of God's eternal law regardless of whether we spoke about Croats, Serbs, Jews, Gypsies, Catholics, Muslims, Orthodox or whoever else…. The Catholic Church does not recognize races that rule and races that are enslaved. - Blessed Alojzije Stepinac, 1943

I know what my duty is. With the grace of God, I will carry it out to the end without hatred towards anyone, and without fear from anyone. - Blessed Alojzije Stepinac

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-alojzije-stepinac/


Saint Scholastica

Profile

Twin sister of Saint Benedict of Nursia. Born to the Italian noblility. Her mother died in childbirth. Nun. She led a community of women at Plombariola near Montecassino. See the Readings section below for Pope Saint Gregory the Great's telling of some of the stories of her life.

Born

480 in Italy

Died

• 543 of natural causes
• from his cell, Saint Benedict had a vision in which he saw her soul flying to heaven in the form of a dove

Patronage

• against lightning
• against rain
• against storms
• Benedictines
• convulsive children
• nuns
• Le Mans, France
• Monte Cassino Abbey

Representation

• nun with crozier and crucifix
• nun with dove flying from her mouth
• dove
• lily

Storefront

medals and pendants
medals, pendants and books

Video

YouTube PlayList

Readings

Scholastica, the sister of Saint Benedict, had been consecrated to God from her earliest years. She was accustomed to visiting her brother once a year. He would come down to meet her at a place on the monastery property, not far outside the gate. One day she came as usual and her saintly brother went with some of his disciples; they spent the whole day praising God and talking of sacred things. As night fell they had supper together. Their spiritual conversation went on and the hour grew late. The holy nun said to her brother, "Please do not leave me tonight; let us go on until morning talking about the delights of the spiritual life." "Sister," he replied, "What are you saying? I simply cannot stay outside my cell." When she heard her brother refuse her request, the holy woman joined her hands on the table, laid her head on them and began to pray. As she raised her head from the table, there were such brilliant flashes of lightning, such great peals of thunder and such a heavy downpour of rain that neither Benedict nor his brethren could stir across the threshold of the place where they had been seated. Sadly, he began to complain. "May God forgive you, sister. What have you done?" "Well, she answered, "I asked you and you would not listen; so I asked my God and he did listen. So now go off, if you can, leave me and return to your monastery." So it came about that they stayed awake the whole night, engrossed in their conversation about the spiritual life. Three days later, Benedict was in his cell. Looking up to the sky, he saw his sister's soul leave her body in the form of a dove, and fly up to the secret places of heaven. Rejoicing in her great glory, he thanked almighty God with hymns and words of praise. He then sent his brethren to bring her body to the monastery and lay it in the tomb he had prepared for himself. - from Dialogues by Pope Saint Gregory the Great

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-scholastica/


Blessed José Sánchez del Río

Profile

Childhood friend of Father Marcial Maciel who founded the Legionnaires of Christ and who witnessed José's death. At age 13 the boy became a flag-bearer in the Cristero army who were fighting to remain Catholic in the face of anti-religious government decrees; his two older brothers, Macario and Miguel, were soldiers, but no one would let José become a front-line soldier as he wanted. Captured by government troops, he was imprisoned, abused, mutilated, and ordered to renouce Christianity; José refused. Martyr.

Born

28 March 1913 in Sahuayo, Michoacán de Ocampo, Mexico

Died

• hacked with machetes, stabbed with bayonets and finally shot on 10 February 1928 in Sahuayo, Michoacán de Ocampo, Mexico
• interred in the Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, Sahuayo
• a bone fragment relic enshrined in the church of the Immaculate Conception, Taft, Texas

Canonized

on 21 January 2016, Pope Francis promulgated a decree of a miracle received through the intercession of Blessed José

Videos

YouTube PlayList

Readings

José Sánchez del Río was born on 28 March 1913 in Sahuayo, Michoacán, Mexico. Wanting to defend the faith and rights of Catholics, he followed in the footsteps of his two older brothers and asked his mother for permission to join the Cristeros. She objected, telling him that he was too young. "Mama", he replied, "do not let me lose the opportunity to gain Heaven so easily and so soon".

On 5 February 1928 the young boy was captured during a battle and imprisoned in the church sacristy. In order to terrorize him, soldiers made him watch the hanging of one of the other captured Cristeros. But José encouraged the man, saying, "You will be in Heaven before me. Prepare a place for me. Tell Christ the King I shall be with him soon".

In prison, he prayed the Rosary and sang songs of faith. He wrote a beautiful letter to his mother telling her that he was resigned to do God's will. José's father attempted to ransom his son, but was unable to raise the money in time.

On 10 February 1928 the teenager was brutally tortured and the skin of the soles of his feet was sheered off; he was then forced to walk on salt, followed by walking through the town to the cemetery. The young boy screamed with pain but would not give in.

At times the soldiers stopped him and said, "If you shout, "Death to Christ the King', we will spare your life". But he answered: "Long live Christ the King! Long live Our Lady of Guadalupe!".

Once he arrived at the cemetery, José was asked once more if he would deny his faith. The 14 year old shouted out: "Long live Christ the King!", and was summarily shot. - Vatican beatification biography

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-jose-sanchez-del-rio/


Blessed William of Maleval

Also known as

• William of Guyenne
• William of Malval
• William of Malvalla
• William of Poitiers
• William the Great
• William the Hermit
• Gulielmus, Wilhelmus

Profile

William lived a wild and dissolute life as a soldier in his youth. However, at some point he began to take his religion seriously, left the military life, and made pilgrimages to the Holy Lands. He became superior of an abbey at Pisa, Italy in 1153. He failed in this position, however, and became a hermit on Mount Bruno. He attracted followers, founded a monastery in 1154, and failed again as abbot. William returned to a life as a hermit, this time around Siena, Italy in 1155 in a wilderness called "Maleval" ("evil valley"). There he attracted followers who were called Williamites, Guillemites, or the barefoot friars. They first following William's severe rule, then the Benedictine, and later the Augustinian. They spread through Italy, France, and Germany, but have not survived until today.

Born

French

Died

10 February 1157 of natural causes

Beatified

1202 (cultus confirmed) by Pope Innocent III

Patronage

• armourers
• blacksmiths
• tinsmiths
• Laoag, Philippines, diocese of
• San Fernando La Union, Philippines, diocese of

Representation

• man bearing a cross staff, one arm of which ends in a crescent
• man bearing a shield with four fleur-de-lys
• man wearing a monastic habit over armour
• man with a pilgrim's staff

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-william-of-maleval/


Blessed Alexander of Lugo

Also known as

• Alexander Baldrati
• Alexander Baldrati a Lugo

Profile

Alexander joined the Dominicans in Lugo, Italy in 1612, then studied in Faenza, Naples, and the convent of Our Lady of the Arch. Priest, assigned to Bologna, Italy soon after ordination. He worked himself so hard, in pulpit and with the needy, that he ruined his health and had to be reassigned to Venice, Italy to recover.

As part of his recovery, and to get him away from the over-work that had crushed him, he was sent by sea to the east. The ship stopped on the Greek island of Chios, and Alexander took the opportunity to preach to the locals. An apostate Christian there took the opportunity to stir up sentiment against Alexander, going to the Muslim authorities and swearing that Alexander had converted to Islam. Alexander was dragged to court, interrogated, and offered in rewards if he would bring other Dominicans to Islam. When he denied that he had ever converted to Islam, the court convicted him of being an apostate Muslim, and charged the Christian authorities of harbouring an apostate.

The archbishop and the Dominicans swore that Alexander had always been a Christian. When questioned again, Alexander denounced Islam, Mohammed, and the Koran. After an brief imprisonment, he was martyred by the Muslim authorities and local citizens.

Born

1595 in Lugo, Italy

Died

hacked to pieces and burned at the stake in 1645 on Chios Island, Greece

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-alexander-of-lugo/


Blessed Mikel Beltoja

Profile

Received theological training from Bishop Ernest Çoba of Shkodrë, Albania. Ordained on 8 December 1961 as a priest of the archdiocese of Shkodrë-Pult, Albania. When the Communist government closed all churches in Albania in March 1967, Father Mikel travelled from village to village, ministering to the people, conducting covert Masses where he could. Arrested on 19 April 1973 in Beltoje, Albania, he was imprisoned for several months, tortured and finally given a trial; he used it to speak out against the Communists and their anti–Christian persecutions. Martyr.

Born

9 May 1935 in Beltoj, Shkodrë, Albania

Died

shot by firing squad on 10 February 1974 in Shkodrë, Albania

Beatified

• 5 November 2016 by Pope Francis
• beatification celebrated at the Square of the Cathedral of Shën Shtjefnit, Shkodër, Albania, presided by Cardinal Angelo Amato

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-mikel-beltoja/


Saint Austrebertha of Pavilly

Also known as

Austreberta, Eustreberta, Eustreverte

Profile

Daughter of Saint Framechildis and the Count Badefrid. Her parents arranged a marriage for her for political reasons, but Austrebertha was drawn to religious life. Benedictine nun, receiving the veil from Saint Omer at Abbeville, France. Abbess at Jumieges, and at Pavilly. Miracle worker and visionary; at one point in her early life she got a foreshadow of her life - she looked at her reflection in a river and saw a veil over her head.

Born

630 at Therouanne, Artois, France

Died

• 704 at Pavilly, Normandy, France
• relics transferred to Montreuil-sur-Mer, France to keep them safe during the Norman invasion
• relics burned in the French Revolution

Patronage

Barentin, France

Representation

with a wolf (it had killed her donkey so she made it take over the donkey's duties)

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-austrebertha-of-pavilly/


Blessed Clare Agolanti of Rimini

Also known as

• Chiara Agolanti
• Clara, Klara

Profile

Born to the nobility. Married twice, she spent most of her time in dissolute, sinful pleasures. When her father and brother were executed in civil disturbances, Clare changed her life completely. She became a Franciscan tertiary and founded a convent, though she never became a nun. In an attempt to make up for her earlier life, she practiced penances that were considered extreme even by 14th century standards.

Born

1282 at Rimini, Italy

Died

• 10 February 1344 at Rimini, Italy of natural causes
• interred at the convent she founded

Beatified

22 December 1784 by Pope Pius VI (cultus confirmed)

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-clare-agolanti-of-rimini/


Blessed Eusebia Palomino Yenes

Profile

Born to a poor but pious family, when she old enough she had to beg to help them survive. She felt a call to religious life, but worked as a servant in a wealthy household, then a nanny in an orphanage. Religious of the Institute of the Daughters of Mary, Help of Christians (Salesian Sisters). She worked as a cook and maid, but her spiritual insights were obvious, and many priests, religious and laity came to her for advice. She had the gift of prophecy, and helped spread devotion to the Wounds of Christ.

Born

15 December 1899 in Cantalpino, Salamanca, Spain

Died

10 February 1935 at Valverde del Camino, Huelva, Spain of natural causes

Beatified

25 April 2004 by Pope John Paul II

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-eusebia-palomino-yenes/


Saint Soteris the Martyr

Profile

Wealthy 3rd century noble family. A beatiful young woman, she consecrated herself to God. Unlike other women of her day, she dressed plainly with no ornamentation so men would ignore her, and lived a quiet, simple life, forshadowing the female religious orders in years to come. Arrested and tortured in her youth during the persecutions of Decius. Released, she returned to her prayerful life only to be murdered a half-century later in the persecutions of Diocletian for refusing sacrifice to pagan gods. All records indicate that, no matter the torture, she never once cried out. Saint Ambrose of Milan claimed she was one of his ancestor, and he wrote about her.

Died

• beaten and beheaded on 10 February 304 in Rome, Italy
• buried in the Catacombs of San Callisto in Rome

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-soteris-the-martyr/


Blessed Catherine du Verdier de la Sorinière

Additional Memorial

2 January as one of the Martyrs of Anjou

Profile

Lay woman of the diocese of Angers, France. Martyred in the persecutions of the French Revolution.

Born

29 June 1758 in Saint-Pierre de Chemillé, Maine-et-Loire, France

Died

10 February 1794 in Avrillé, Maine-et-Loire, France

Beatified

19 February 1984 by Pope John Paul II at Rome, Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-catherine-du-verdier-de-la-soriniere/


Saint Charalampias

Also known as

Caralampo, Charalampos, Charalampus, Charalampius, Charalambos, Haralampos, Haralampus, Haralabos, Haralambos, Kharalampos

Profile

Priest. Martyred with five companions during the persecutions of Emperor Septimius Severus.

Died

• 203 in Magnesia, Asia Minor (in modern Turkey)
• skull enshrined in the monastery of Saint Stephen in Meteora in central Greece

Patronage

• against plague
• against cattle diseases
• against cholera

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-charalampias/


Blessed Marie-Anne Hacher du Bois

Additional Memorial

2 January as one of the Martyrs of Anjou

Profile

Lay woman of the diocese of Angers, France. Martyred in the persecutions of the French Revolution.

Born

3 April 1765 in Jallais, Maine-et-Loire, France

Died

10 February 1794 in Avrillé, Maine-et-Loire, France

Beatified

19 February 1984 by Pope John Paul II at Rome, Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-marie-anne-hacher-du-bois/


Blessed Marie-Louise du Verdier de la Sorinière

Additional Memorial

2 January as one of the Martyrs of Anjou

Profile

Lay woman of the diocese of Angers, France. Martyred in the persecutions of the French Revolution.

Born

27 June 1765 in Saint-Pierre de Chemillé, Maine-et-Loire, France

Died

10 February 1794 in Avrillé, Maine-et-Loire, France

Beatified

19 February 1984 by Pope John Paul II at Rome, Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-marie-louise-du-verdier-de-la-soriniere/


Blessed Hugh of Fosse

Also known as

Hugues

Profile

Priest. Disciple of Saint Norbert, and succeeded him as superior general of the Premonstratensians. Under his leadership the Order grew to 120 houses.

Born

at Fosse, Belgium

Died

• 1164 of natural causes
• relics transferred to the Cathédrale Notre-Dame of Laon, France in 1896

Beatified

13 July 1927 by Pope Pius XI (cultus confirmed)

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-hugh-of-fosse/


Blessed Louise Poirier épouse Barré

Additional Memorial

2 January as one of the Martyrs of Anjou

Profile

Married lay woman of the diocese of Angers, France. Martyred in the persecutions of the French Revolution.

Born

22 February 1754 in Le Longeron, Maine-et-Loire, France

Died

10 February 1794 in Avrillé, Maine-et-Loire, France

Beatified

19 February 1984 by Pope John Paul II at Rome, Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-louise-poirier-epouse-barre/


Saint Trumwin of Whitby

Also known as

• Trumwin of Abercorn
• Trumwine, Trumma, Tumma, Trumwinus, Triumwini, Trumuini

Profile

Bishop of the Southern Picts in Scotland in 681; he worked from the monastery of Abercorn on the Firth of Forth. When King Egfrid was killed by the Picts in 685, Trumwin and his monks had to flee the area. Retired to spend his later years as a prayerful monk in Whitby, England.

Died

c.704 of natural causes

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-trumwin-of-whitby/


Blessed Paul of Wallachia

Profile

Studied law at the University of Bologna, Italy. A friend of Saint Dominic de Guzman, Paul joined the Dominicans and returned to Hungary to establish the Order there. With a group of approximately 90 others, he travelled to Wallachia, an area of modern Romania, as a missionary to the pagan Cumans. They were all martyred.

Born

Hungary

Died

c.1240 in Wallachia (in modern Romania)

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-paul-of-wallachia/


Blessed Pierre Frémond

Addtional Memorial

2 January as one of the Martyrs of Anjou

Profile

Layman of the diocese of Angers, France. Martyred in the persecutions of the French Revolution.

Born

16 September 1754 in Chaudefonds, Maine-et-Loire, France

Died

10 February 1794 in Avrillé, Maine-et-Loire, France

Beatified

19 February 1984 by Pope John Paul II at Rome, Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-pierre-fremond/


Saint Baptus of Magnesia

Also known as

Bapto, Baptos, Dauktos, Dauto

Profile

Eyewitness to executions of Christians who was so moved by their courage that he examined the faith and converted. Martyred with five companions during the persecutions of Emperor Septimius Severus.

Died

203 in Magnesia, Asia Minor

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-baptus-of-magnesia/


Blessed Louise Bessay de la Voûte

Profile

Lay woman of the diocese of Angers, France. Martyred in the persecutions of the French Revolution.

Born

22 August 1721 in Saint-Mars-des-Prés, Vendée France

Died

10 February 1794 in Avrillé, Maine-et-Loire, France

Beatified

19 February 1984 by Pope John Paul II at Rome, Italy

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-louise-bessay-de-la-voute/


Saint Porfirio

Also known as

Porfyrius, Porfirio, Porphyry

Profile

Imperial executioner who was so moved by the courage of the Christians he was murdering that he examined the faith and converted. Martyred with five companions during the persecutions of Emperor Septimius Severus.

Died

203 in Magnesia, Asia Minor

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-porfirio/


Saint Erluph of Werden

Also known as

Erlulph

Profile

Missionary to Germany. Bishop of Werden, Germany. Martyred by pagans.

Born

Scotland

Died

830

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-erluph-of-werden/


Saint Prothadius of Besançon

Also known as

Protagius of Besançon

Profile

Bishop of Besançon, France.

Died

624

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-prothadius-of-besancon/


Saint Desideratus of Clermont

Also known as

Désiré of Clermont

Profile

Sixth century bishop of Clermont, Auvergne, France.

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-desideratus-of-clermont/


Saint Aponius of Bethlehem

Profile

First century convert martyred in the persecutions of King Herod Antipas.

Died

1st century Bethlehem

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-aponius-of-bethlehem/


Saint Troiano of Saintes

Also known as

Trojan

Profile

Fifth-century bishop of Saintes, Aquitaine (in modern France).

Died

c.500

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-troiano-of-saintes/


Saint Andrew of Bethlehem

Profile

First century convert martyred in the persecutions of King Herod Antipas.

Died

1st century Bethlehem

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-andrew-of-bethlehem/


Saint Silvanus of Terracina

Profile

Fourth-century bishop of Terracina, Italy.

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-silvanus-of-terracina/


Blessed Paganus

Profile

Benedictine monk in Sicily. Hermit.

Born

Italian

Died

1423

http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-paganus/


Saint Salvius of Albelda

Profile

Abbot at Albelda, Spain.

Died

962

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-salvius-of-albelda/


Saint Baldegundis

Profile

Abbess of Saint-Croix in Poitiers, France.

Died

c.580

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-baldegundis/


Martyred Soldiers of Rome

Profile

A group of ten Christian soldiers who were martyred together for their faith. We know little more about them but four of their names - Amantius, Hyacinth, Irenaeus and Zoticus.

Died

• 120 at Rome, Italy
• buried on the Via Lavicana outside Rome


Also celebrated but no entry yet

• Anna of Holmgard
• Bruno Minden
• Cronan of Clashmore
• Eusebius of Murano
• Herman of Novgorod
• Holy Hierarchs of Novgorod
• Julia
• Luke Zjidjata of Novgorod
• Maxima
• Prochorus of the Caves
• Verissimus


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