1 September • yesterday
• tomorrow

An English Tribute to Saint Joseph, by Father Frederick William Faber
Meditations for Layfolk - The Liturgy, by Father Bede Jarrett

Saint Giles

Also known as

Aegidius, Aegidus, Aigeides, Aigigios, Egidio, Egidius, Egydius, Gil, Gilg, Gilgen, Gilgian, Gilles, Ilg, Ilgen, Jilg

Profile

Born to the wealthy, Greek nobility; when his parents died, Giles gave his fortune to help the poor. Known as a miracle worker. To avoid followers and adulation, he left Greece c.683 for France where he lived as a hermit in a cave in the diocese of Nîmes, a cave whose mouth was guarded by a thick thorn bush, and a lifestyle so impoverished that, legend says, God sent a deer to Giles to nourish him with her milk; a tradition developed that made him a patron of nursing mothers, and those suffering with breast cancer.

One day after he had lived there for several years in meditation, a royal hunting party chased the deer into Giles' cave. One hunter shot an arrow into the thorn bush, hoping to hit the deer, but instead hit Giles in the leg, crippling him. The king sent doctors to care for hermit's wound, and though Giles begged to be left alone, the king came often to see him.

From this, Gile's fame as sage and miracle worker spread, and would-be followers gathered near the cave. The French king, because of his admiration, built the monastery of Saint Gilles du Gard for these followers, and Giles became its first abbot, establishing his own discipline there. A small town grew up around the monastery, and upon Giles' death, his grave became a shrine and place of pilgrimage; the monastery later became a Benedictine house.

The combination of the town, monastery, shrine and pilgrims led to many handicapped beggars hoping for alms; this and Giles' insistence that he wished to live outside the walls of the city, and his own damaged leg, led to his patronage of beggars, and to cripples since begging was the only source of income for many. Hospitals and safe houses for the poor, crippled, and leprous were constructed in England and Scotland, and were built so cripples could reach them easily. On their passage to Tyburn for execution, convicts were allowed to stop at Saint Giles' Hospital where they were presented with a bowl of ale called Saint Giles' Bowl, "thereof to drink at their pleasure, as their last refreshing in this life."

In Spain, shepherds consider Giles the protector of rams. It was formerly the custom to wash the rams and colour their wool a bright shade on Giles' feast day, tie lighted candles to their horns, and bring the animals down the mountain paths to the chapels and churches to have them blessed. Among the Basques, the shepherds come down from the Pyrenees on 1 September, attired in full costume, sheepskin coats, staves, and crooks, to attend Mass with their best rams, an event that marks the beginning of autumn festivals, marked by processions and dancing in the fields. Giles is one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers, the only one not to die as a martyr.

Born

at Athens, Greece

Died

• between 710 and 724 in France of natural causes
• legend says that those who attended his funeral heard choirs of angels singing and then fading away as they carried his soul to heaven
• his tomb is in the crypt of the abbey church of Saint-Gilles, Gard, France
• in 1562, Huguenots burned the abbey, murdered the monks, looted the church, and vandalized the tomb; the surviving relics of Saint Giles were distributed to other churches
• in Scotland in the seventeenth century, his relics were stolen from a church which triggered a great riot

Patronage

• against breast cancer • against cancer in general; of cancer patients • against epilepsy; of epileptics • against noctiphobia or fear of night; of noctiphobics • against insanity or mental illness; of mentally ill people • against leprosy; of lepers • against plague • against sterility or barrenness • against drought • against fire • against storms • abandoned people; against abandonment • beggars • breast feeding or nursing mothers • disabled, handicapped or physically challenged people; cripples • hermits • poor people, paupers • forests, wood lands • horses • rams • blacksmiths • shepherds • spur makers • - • Graz, Austria • Klagenfurt, Austria • Monte San Savino, Italy • Tolfa, Italy • Edinburgh, Scotland

Representation

• arrow; cave; crosier; deer, hind, doe, roe; hermitage; Benedictine monk;
• lilies growing in the sand (refers to a legend that says three lilies blossomed in dry sand as Giles explained three points to prove the perpetual virginity of Mary to a doubter)

Video

YouTube PlayList

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Giles


Blessed Giuliana of Collalto

Also known as

Juliana

Profile

Born to the Italian nobility, the daughter of Count Rambaldo VI and Countess Giovanna of Sant'Angelo of Mantua. She received a Christian education, and at age 12, she entered the Benedictine convent of Santa Margherita di Salarola near Calaone, Italy. There she became a friend of Blessed Beatrix of Este the Elder who entered the convent in 1220. Founded a Benedictine convent on Spinalonga (modern Giudecca) off Venice, Italy, and served as its abbess. Known for her charity and care for the local poor. Late in life she began suffering from severe headaches, possibly migraines, which led to her patronage of others who do.

Blessed Giuliana was reported to be a miracle worker, including -

• instantly healing the shattered broken arm of one of her nuns by praying over her

• she went to the prison cell of an innocent man, opened the prison doors and removed all his chains simply by praying over them

• one Christmas night a severe storm kept the local priest from reaching the convent, Giuliana prayed about the problem; an angel carrying the Christ child appeared to the nuns, announcing the birth of Jesus

Born

1186 in Collalto, Susegana, Treviso, Italy

Died

• 1 September 1262 at Venice, Italy of natural causes
• buried in the cemetery of the San Biagio church of the Spinalonga convent
• the location of her grave was lost, but in 1297 dozens of small flaming torches were seen to hover over it; her body found to be incorrupt
• relics enshrined in a wooden sarcophagus the in the church altar in 1733
• relics moved to the church of the Redeemer in Venice in 1810
• relics moved to the Saint Anne chapel at the parish church of Saint Euphemia in Venice in 1820
• the original wooden sarcophagus is on exhibit in the Museo Correr in Venice
• some relics enshrined in a church in Collalto, Italy

Beatified

20 May 1753 by Pope Benedict XIV (cultus confirmed)

Patronage

• against headaches
• against migraines; of migraine sufferers

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Blessed_Giuliana_of_Collalto


Blessed Douceline of Digne

Also known as

Douceline of Hyères

Profile

Daughter of Berengarius of Digne, a prosperous merchant, and Huguette of Barjols; the couple was known for their piety and charity. Following the death of her parents, she moved to Hyères, France, and was drawn to the spirituality of the Franciscans who had recently moved into the area; she sometimes stayed at a Poor Clare convent. She spent her time caring for the sick and poor, and her personal property dwindled to the clothes on her back and a pile of straw she used for a bed.

Learning of the Beguine life, she adopted the Beguine habit; she attracted a number of like-minded women who became the community of Beguines in Hyères known as the "Ladies of Roubaud", named after a river that flowed near where they met. In 1240, Douceline took vows of virginity and poverty, and became leader of the "Ladies". In 1250, with the invitation and help of her brother Hugues of Digne, a Franciscan friar who wrote the rule of the group, she established a Beguine house in Marseille, France. Her reputation for holy wisdom spread, she became a counsellor to many people of all stations, was known to levitate while in prayer, and though she never joined the Franciscans, the local brothers and sisters considered her one of their own.

Born

1214 in Digne-les-Bains, Provence (in modern France)

Died

• 1 September 1274 in Marseille, France of natural causes
• interred in the the Franciscan church in Marseille next to her brother Hugues
• the bishop of Orange, France delivered her funeral eulogy
• relics transferred to the New Major church when the old one was demolished in 1524
• relics transferred to the new cathedral, built in 1857

Patronage

Hyères, France

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Blessed_Douceline_of_Digne


Saint Lupus of Sens

Profile

Leu, Loup, Lowe, Lupo, Wolf

Profile

Born to the Burgundian nobility, he was early noted to have a love to Christ and the Church. Nephew of Saint Austremius of Orleans, and Saint Aunarius of Auxerre who both saw to his education. Noted for his love of music and his generosity to the poor. Monk at Lérins. Priest. Archbishop of Sens, Burgundy (in modern France) in 609.

When Lupus hesitated to acknowledge Clotaire II as the rightful ruler of Burgundy, and insisted that the will of God trumps the will of rulers, Clotaire used the excuse of slander about Lupo and a woman to exile him to Ansenne, a predominently pagan area. Lupus evangelized the people of the area, converting many, including the region's governor. When Lupus' replacement in Burgundy, the politically ambitious monk Monegisil, was killed during a riot, the people demanded the return of their rightful bishop. Clotaire recalled Lupus, and punished those who had spoken against him.

Legend says that once when celebrating Mass, a jewel descended from heaven into the elevated chalice.

Born

near Orleans, Gaul (in modern France)

Died

• 623 in Brienon-sur-Armançon, Yonne, France of natural causes
• buried under the gutter of Saint Columba's basilica, Sens, France
• relics transferred to the new cathedral on 23 July 853

Patronage

against epilepsy; of epileptics

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Lupus_of_Sens


Exiles of Campania

Profile

Twelve priests of northern Africa who were driven into exile into Italy by Arian Vandals. There they continued to be outspoken about their faith; all became noted preachers and evangelists, and some bishops in their dioceses. We have a few details about their individual lives, and the areas in which they became patrons. Their names are Adiutor, Augustus, Canion, Castrensis, Elpidius, Heraclius, Marcus, Priscus, Rosius, Secundinus, Tammarus and Vindonius.

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Exiles_of_Campania


Saint Nivard of Reims

Also known as

Nivardo, Nivo

Profile

Born to the wealthy Gallic nobility, related to the Merovingians, and brother-in-law of King Childeric II of Austrasia. He grew up in the royal court and was an adult before feeling a call to religious life. Priest. Archbishop of Reims, France in 657.

Because of his court contacts, and because Reims was the capital of King Clovis II, Nivard obtained great benefits from the rich and powerful which he used to support religious houses. He worked helped found the Saint-Pierre Abbey in Hautvillers, France, a house that combined the rules of Saint Benedict of Nursia and Saint Columbanus, and was the house where tradition says Dom Pierre Perignon developed the process to make champagne. Bishop Nivard also built churches in his diocese and supported the monasteries of Corbie, Soissons and Fontenelle.

Born

early 7th century in the region of Reims, France

Died

• 1 September 673 of natural causes
• buried at Saint-Pierre Abbey, Hautvillers, France

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Nivard_of_Reims


Blessed Giovanna Soderini

Also known as

• Giovanna da Firenze
• Jane Soderini
• Johanna Soderini

Profile

Born to the Italian nobility. Spiritual student of Saint Giuliana Falconieri. She became a Servite tertiary and withdrew from worldly life to live on Mount Senario, attending Mass every morning, in Eucharistic adoration every night. She was for her life of prayer and austerity, and her devotion to the Passion of Christ and the Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

Born

1301 at Florence, Italy

Died

1 September 1367 in or near Florence, Italy of natural causes

Beatified

1 October 1828 by Pope Leo XII (cultus confirmation)

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Blessed_Giovanna_Soderini


Saint Terentianus of Todi

Also known as

Terenciano, Terentian, Térentien, Terenziano

Profile

Priest. Bishop of Todi, Umbria, Italy. Old traditions says that he was tortured on the rack, had his tongue cut out for preaching, and martyred in the persecutions of Hadrian in 118, but it is more likely that he was died in the 4th century.

Patronage

• Capranica, Italy
• Fraore, Italy
• Isola di Compiano, Italy
• Nicorvo, Italy
• Rezzoaglio, Italy
• San Terenziano, Italy
• Teano, Italy

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Terentianus_of_Todi


Saint Firminus the Younger

Also known as

• Firminus II
• Firman...

Additional Memorial

2 January (translation of relics)

Profile

His father, Faustinian, was prefect of imperial Roman Gaul and a convert, baptized by Saint Firminus of Amiens; Faustinian named his son Firminus in honour of the saint. Firminus became a priest, and c.350, he was chosen the third bishop of Amiens, France where he served for about 40 years.

Died

• c.390 of natural causes
• buried in the church of Our Lady in Amiens, France; the church has since been renamed for Saint Acheul
• relics translated to the cathedral of Amiens in the 7th century

https://catholicsaints.info/saint-firminus-the-younger/


Blessed Colomba of Mount Brancastello

Profile

Born to the nobility, she was the daughter of the count of Pagliara, Italy, and sister of Saint Bernard Valeara of Teramo. As a teenager, Colomba retired to live as a mountain hermitess in a cave. Near the cave is an imprint in the rock that looks like a hand; tradition says it's where Colomba grabbed the stone to reach her home of solitude.

Born

1100 in Pagliara, Teramo, Italy

Died

• winter 1116 on Mount Brancastello, Italy of natural causes
• Saint Bernard Valeara of Teramo built a chapel on the site of her hermitage cave

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Blessed_Colomba_of_Mount_Brancastello


Saint Firminus the Younger

Also known as

• Firminus II
• Firman...

Additional Memorial

2 January (translation of relics)

Profile

His father, Faustinian, was prefect of imperial Roman Gaul and a convert, baptized by Saint Firminus of Amiens; Faustinian named his son Firminus in honour of the saint. Priest. Third bishop of Amiens, France c.350, serving for about 40 years.

Died

• c.390 of natural causes
• buried in the church of Our Lady, which has since been renamed for Saint Acheul in Amiens, France
• relics translated to the cathedral of Amiens in the 7th century

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Firminus_the_Younger


Joshua the Patriarch

Also known as

• Joshua the Prophet
• Joshua, son of Nun
• Giosuè, Hosea, Hoshea, Jehoshua, Jesus, Josua, Josue, Josuë, Jozua, Jozuë, Osee, Yehoshu'a, Yehoshúa, Yeshua

Profile

Old Testament patriarch. The successor of Moses the PatriarchMoses as leader of the Israelites, he led them into Canaan. Led the Israelite forces that took Jericho.

Born

in pre-Exodus Egypt as Hoshea

Died

c.12th century BC

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Joshua_the_Patriarch


Abdon the Judge

Also known as

• Abdon ben-Hillel
• Abed-Dün

Profile

Judge of Israel for 8 years, as described in the Old Testament Book of Judges. Married, the father of 40 sons, grandfather of 30 children.

Born

in Pirathon

Died

buried in Pirathon

Readings

After him Abdon, son of Hillel, the Pirathonite, judged Israel. He had forty sons and thirty grandsons, who rode on seventy donkeys. He judged Israel for eight years. Abdon, son of Hillel, the Pirathonite, died and was buried in Pirathon in the land of Ephraim in the mountain region of the Amalekites. - Judges 12:13-15 (NABRE)

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Abdon_the_Judge


Ibzan the Judge

Also known as

• Ibzan of Bethlehem
• Abesan, Ebzan

Profile

Judge of Israel for 7 years, as described in the Old Testament Book of Judges. Married and the father of 30 sons and 30 daughters.

Born

Israelite

Died

buried in Bethlehem

Readings

After him Ibzan of Bethlehem judged Israel. He had thirty sons and thirty daughters whom he gave in marriage outside the family, while bringing in thirty wives for his sons from outside the family. He judged Israel for seven years. Ibzan died and was buried in Bethlehem. - Judges 12:8-10 (NABRE)

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Ibzan_the_Judge


Blessed Giustino of Paris

Profile

Trained in the law, he taught at the University of Paris, France. Mercedarian secular knight in Valencia, Spain. Assigned to Granada, Spain where he worked to ransom Christians held prisoner by the Moors, and encourage Christians who were about to renounce their faith in fear. Beaten and murdered by Moors for his work. Martyr.

Born

Paris, France

Died

hanged in 1337 in Granada, Spain

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Blessed_Giustino_of_Paris


Saint Regulus

Also known as

Regolo

Profile

Priest. Bishop. Exiled from North Africa to Tuscany, Italy by Arian Vandals; there he lived as a holy and miracle working hermit. Martyred in the persecutions of Totila of the Ostrogoths.

Born

North Africa

Died

• beheaded c.545 in the Tuscan region of Italy
• relics enshrined in the cathedral of San Martino in Lucca, Italy

Patronage

• Montaione, Italy
• Vagli Sotto, Italy
• Metropolitan Chapter of the Cathedral of San Martino, Lucca, Italy

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Regulus


Saint Victorious of Le Mans

Also known as

Vittore, Victor

Profile

Sub-deacon. Married and the father of one son. Spiritual student of Saint Martin of Tours. At the recommendation of Saint Martin, Victorius was chosen bishop of Le Mans, France c.450; his wife became a nun and Victorius served for approximately 40 years. He attended the Council of Angers in 453, and the Council of Tours in 461. Saint Gregory of Tours wrote about him.

Died

c.490 in Le Mans, Lugden Gaul (in modern France)

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Victorious_of_Le_Mans


Saint Verena of Zurich

Also known as

Verena of Zurzach

Profile

Related to one of the soldiers of the Theban Legion. Verena travelled to the area of modern Switzerland to search for him. After learning of his death, she settled down to live as an anchoress near Zurich.

Born

Egypt

Died

3rd century

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Verena_of_Zurich


Saint Constantius of Aquino

Also known as

Costantino

Profile

Bishop of Aquino, Italy c.465 to c.487. Attended the Council of Rome in 465. Had the gift of prophecy. Pope Saint Gregory the Great wrote about him in the Dialogues, and Saint Peter the Deacon wrote a biography of him.

Died

c.487 of natural causes

Patronage

• Aquino, Italy
• Aquino-Pontecorvo, Italy, diocese of
• Sora-Aquino-Pontecorvo, Italy, diocese of

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Constantius_of_Aquino


Our Lady of Montevergine

Also known as

• Madonna di Montevergine
• Madonna Bruna
• Mamma Schiavona

Profile

One of the so-called Black Madonnas, this image serves as part of the altar piece of the Sanctuary on Montevergine, Italy, the destination of thousands of pilgrims each year.

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Our_Lady_of_Montevergine


Saint Sulien of Amorica

Also known as

Giles, Silin, Ssilin, Sulian, Sulinus

Additional Memorial

1 January as one of the Breton Missionaries to Britain

Profile

Born to the Breton nobility. Missionary to the British Isles, working to oppose heresies. Hermit on an island near Anglesy, Wales. He then returned to Brittany where he converted many and led a group of spiritual students.

Born

6th century Brittany (in modern France)

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Sulien_of_Amorica


Saint Sinicius of Reims

Also known as

Sinice, Sinicio

Profile

Worked with Saint Sixtus of Reims, and became second bishop of Reims, France upon the death of Sixtus, and served c.280 to c.286.

Died

c.280 of natural causes

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Sinicius_of_Reims


Saint Aegidius of Sansepolcro

Also known as

Egidio, Giles

Profile

With Saint Arcanus of Sansepolcro, he made a pilgrimage to Palestine where they collected relics of the saints, and brought them back to Italy in the mid- to late-10th century. They founded a Benedictine monastery, which grew into Borgo San Sepulcro (modern Sansepolcro, Italy), to house them.

Born

Spain

Died

c.1050 of natural causes

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Aegidius_of_Sansepolcro


Saint Arcanus of Sansepolcro

Also known as

Arcanum, Arcano

Profile

With Saint Aegidius of Sansepolcro, he made a pilgrimage to Palestine where they collected relics of the saints, and brought them back to Italy in the mid- to late-10th century. They founded a Benedictine monastery, which grew into Borgo San Sepulcro (modern Sansepolcro), Italy, to house them.

Born

Italy

Died

c.1050 of natural causes

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Arcanus_of_Sansepolcro


Saint Sixtus of Reims

Also known as

Sixte, Xystus

Profile

First bishop of Reims, France, serving from c.270 to c.280. Worked with Saint Sinicius of Reims.

Died

c.280 of natural causes

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Sixtus_of_Reims


Abigail the Matriarch

Profile

Jewish laywoman and Old Testament matriarch. Wife of King David. One of the seven women considered a prophet by the Talmudic scholars. Her story is related in 1st Samuel.

Born

c.1000 BC

Died

c.950 BC

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Abigail_the_Matriarch


Saint Priscus of Capua

Also known as

Prisco

Profile

Assigned by Saint Peter the Apostle as first bishop of Capua, Italy. Martyred in the persecutions of Nero.

Died

c.66

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Priscus_of_Capua


Blessed Simone Ponce

Profile

Mercedarian friar. Assigned to the Andalusia region of modern Spain, he suffered abuse from the Moors, but managed to free 137 Christians enslaved by Muslims.

Born

Spain

Died

1359 of natural causes

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Blessed_Simone_Ponce


Saint Ambrosinian of Armenia

Also known as

Ambrosinien, Ambrosinia

Profile

Bishop from southern Armenia who came to France at an unknown time. He was revered by the parents of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux who dedicated a chapel to him.

Died

relics enshrined in the cathedral of Langres, France

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Ambrosinian_of_Armenia


Blessed Luigi Conciso

Profile

Mercedarian friar. A doctor of theology, he wrote a number of books about the Mercedarians. Assigned to Algiers in north Africa, he freed 88 Christians who had been enslaved by Muslims.

Died

1372

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Blessed_Luigi_Conciso


Saint Vincent of Xaintes

Also known as

• Vincent of Dax
• Vincent of Aquae Augustae

Profile

First bishop of Dax, France. Worked with Saint Laetus of Dax. Martyr.

Born

Toledo, Spain

Died

5th century

Patronage

Dax, France

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Vincent_of_Xaintes


Saint Arealdo of Brescia

Memorial

1 September

Profile

Martyred with his sons Carillo and Oderico by invading Lombards.

Died

• c.576 in Brescia, Italy
• relics enshrined in the cathedral in Brescia in 1305
• relics transferred to the cathedral crypt on 8 June 1614

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Arealdo_of_Brescia


Blessed Giles of Castaneda

Profile

Benedictine Cistercian monk. Abbot of the monastery of San Martín de Castaneda, diocese of Astorga, Spain. In his old age he retired from community life to live as a prayerful hermit.

Born

Spanish

Died

c.1203 of natural causes

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Blessed_Giles_of_Castaneda


Saint Anea of Como

Profile

Child martyr.

Died

• in Rome, Italy, date unknown
• interred in the catacombs of Rome
• relics transferred to the church of San Croce in Como, Italy in 1700

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Anea_of_Como


Saint Laetus of Dax

Profile

Deacon in the diocese of Dax, France. Worked with Saint Vincent of Xaintes.

Died

5th century

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Laetus_of_Dax


Saint Agia

Also known as

Aia, Aye

Profile

Married. Mother of Saint Lupus of Sens. Widow.

Died

6th century

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Agia


Saint Lythan

Also known as

Llythaothaw

Profile

Two churches in Wales are dedicated to this saint, but no information about him has survived.

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Saint_Lythan


Twelve Holy Brothers

Also known as

Martyrs of the South

Profile

A group of martyrs who died c.303 at various places in southern Italy. In 760 their relics were brought together and enshrined in Benevento, Italy as a group.

Saint Arontius of Potenza
Saint Donatus of Sentianum
Saint Felix of Sentianum
Saint Felix of Venosa
Saint Fortunatus of Potenza
Saint Honoratus of Potenza
Saint Januarius of Venosa
Saint Repositus of Velleianum
Saint Sabinian of Potenza
Saint Sator of Velleianum
Saint Septiminus of Venosa
Saint Vitalis of Velleianum

One tradition describes Saint Boniface of Hadrumetum and Saint Thecla of Hadrumetum as their parents.

http://www.catholicsaints.co/Twelve_Holy_Brothers


Martyred in the Spanish Civil War

Thousands of people were murdered in the anti-Catholic persecutions of the Spanish Civil War from 1934 to 1939. I have pages on each of them, but in most cases I have only found very minimal information. They are available on the CatholicSaints.Info site through these links:

Blessed Agustín Navarro Iniesta
Blessed Alejandro Cobos Celada
Blessed Alfonso Sebastiá Viñals
Blessed Amparo Carbonell Muñoz
Blessed Andrés Iniesta Egea
Blessed Antonio Lorca Muñoz
Blessed Antonio Villanueva Igual
Blessed Carmen Moreno Benítez
Blessed Crescencio Lasheras Aizcorbe
Blessed Enrique López y López
Blessed Francesc Trullen Gilisbarts
Blessed Guillermo Rubio Alonso
Blessed Isidro Gil Arano
Blessed Joaquín Ruiz Cascales
Blessed Joaquim Pallerola Feu
Blessed José Franco Gómez
Blessed José Prats Sanjuán
Blessed Josep Samsó y Elias
Blessed Juan José Egea Rodríguez
Blessed Julian Villanueva Alza
Blessed Manuel Mateo Calvo
Blessed Mariano Niño Pérez
Blessed Maximiano Fierro Pérez
Blessed Miquel Roca Huguet
Blessed Nicolás Aramendía García
Blessed Pedro Meca Moreno
Blessed Pedro Rivera y Rivera
Blessed Pio Ruiz De La Torre
Blessed Simó Isidre Joaquím Brun Ararà
Blessed Tomás Galipienzo Perlada


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